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THE ILLUSTRATIONS OF A TEACHER IN PRISON

Booklet PDF

WHO AM I?
I was born in 1983, in the city of Zonguldak, Turkey. My mother was a housewife; my father was a retired teacher. We were four siblings, and I was the only male child in the house. Due to my father’s profession, we lived in many different cities and towns and had the opportunity to experience various geographies, places, and people. Though I was never very good at my studies, ever since I was little I always had an interest in the arts, particularly drawing. I don’t remember when I first began to be interested in drawing. When I couldn’t find any paper to draw on, I would go ahead and draw my pictures on the walls of our house. Needless to say, I received a fair share of scolding from my mom on that account. During my high school years, through the encouragement of my art teacher, I enrolled in a painting (drawing) course in the city we lived in. Enrolling in this course naturally paved my way into a great university. After completing my [extended] university education, through the reference from the private school where I completed my internship, I was offered a job in a very nice district/city. (This is, in fact, the place where I hope to settle down one day once I reach my retirement, God-willing.) After working in that position for a year, I had to leave in order to fulfill my mandatory military service. Upon completing my military service, I came back and started prepping for the public employee selection exams. When I couldn’t score enough points to be appointed to a public school, I started working at another private school. Unfortunately, due to some unpleasant situations I came across, I had to leave my job there. I spent the next year preparing for the exams one more time. When I could not again score enough points the second time around, my brother-in-law encouraged me to go to Mardin, a city in southeastern Turkey, where there was a shortage of teachers at a private school there. After working at that school for two years, I met my future wife and we got married. Shortly after I heard about an opening for a teaching position in the city which I had loved dearly but had had to leave years ago. Without wasting any time, I applied for the position. I spent four wonderful years teaching in that city, four wonderful years… after which dark clouds started falling upon us.

WHAT I EXPERIENCED DURING THIS WHOLE ORDEAL

I imagine you are somewhat familiar with what comes next. First of all, our work permits were canceled. When I saw the news on television and learned that a state of emergency had been declared, I did my best to keep calm. I asked my mother-in-law to make us some tea so we could sit and enjoy ourselves and not let this bring our spirits down. My wife ended up crying that evening. I tried to reassure her and told her, “Don’t worry. Even if Allah has blocked one path, He will surely open up another.” Sure enough, after that we worked in many different places, in many different cities. There were times when we were even laughed at and mocked. But never did we ever resort to any embarrassing acts or engage in any disgraceful activities. To this day, I can proudly say that we can hold our heads high and walk with dignity. In any case, the government had already started arbitrarily firing people from their jobs, and some opportunist business owners used that opening to hire these unfortunate victims, paying them less than half the amount of what the job should have paid, not to mention the fact that they were denied any benefits or insurance. I’m talking about people who were just like us. I heard of a teacher that had begun working at a gas station. Some friends of the business owner –who were pro-government–were constantly pressuring him, saying, “What?!! How come he is still working for you? Just fire him!” His answer to their objections was quite meaningful; he had replied, “Find me a guy who is as trustworthy and honest as this one and I will fire this one right away.” As far as I know, that person is still working at that gas station… Before having been taken to prison, I had started working at a publishing house. Since I hadn’t been particularly happy with their work policy, I had left that job. And now after my time in prison, I am working at another publishing house. Thanks and praise be to my dear God, I am among the ones who actually has a job to go to. In a country where more than half of the young population is out looking for work, this is truly a blessing. As I head out to work each morning, I catch myself thinking back to the days I spent locked behind bars. Judging by the surprised looks of the people walking past me on the sidewalk, I’m guessing I probably have a huge smile on my face as my thoughts wander back. I used to be a teacher before all this happened. And not just any teacher… I was a teacher who for nine whole years had gone to every class, every day with the same excitement and enthusiasm as the last!.. Thus, I will use a teacher example to explain the next part of my story. You know when you ask a parent about a teacher– if they happen to know the teacher you are asking about–the first thought to cross their mind will probably be, ”Let’s see, was there anything negative about this teacher?” (Of course, they’ll probably be keeping this thought to themselves.) If they can’t think of anything bad, then they’ll say the teacher was ok and kind of brush that off as an answer. The reason? If you ask me, it’s just how people naturally react, that’s all. The first thought to enter our minds about a person is the bad memories they left us with (if any). When you think back about a previous teacher, the things you remember are whether you experienced anything negative with that teacher or not. Now, coming back to my own story, when people ask me how it was on the “inside,” first of all, a great big smile spreads across my face. Then I remember the jokes, the pranks, the fooling around and the sweet mischief, the chitchats around a pot of tea, our excitement for the “snack bar” day, and our deep conversations that extended well into the night. In all honesty, the bad memories are the ones that I remember the last. Now you ask me, is this normal? I should probably start off with telling you that I, myself, am not your typical, normal guy. I can say that I had already somewhat driven myself out of my mind years ago with all the doodling and drawing and the shaping clay into statues and sculptures and crushing them into tiny bits after taking them from the mold, and whatnot… Or maybe it was because I had no bad memories from the “inside.” The people I was in prison with were all educated people, well-mannered and people of good character. The couple of months I spent with them was not wasted with problems like having to learn to adapt to a new environment or wait until we “clicked” with the others. It felt as though I was staying with childhood buddies that I had known my whole life, arm in arm, hand in hand, lighthearted fun and ruckus all around. There was hardship, though, I cannot deny that. And I try to portray that in my drawings. In fact, you’ll see later on that I had a special wish regarding this matter, during the time I was in prison (which may surprise you a bit). The coup attempt that took place in the country was a kind of revolution that had completely different effects on the people going about their lives outside and on those of us who were locked “inside.” We had now become “the other.” People who knew us, who knew who and what we were, would not even walk on the same side of the street with us anymore, they would change their paths once they saw us coming. I didn’t let this become a concern of mine. My own father was among the first to be taken into custody during the initial operations carried out in the city of Konya. I cannot forget the day he was taken away. They just showed up at our house early one morning and took him away before we even had a chance to understand what was going on. God bless them, at least they were considerate about it; they did not shout about or throw insults like the stories we had heard of others. I spent some time looking for work here and there. Naturally, almost every door I went to closed upon me. In fact, during one of my interviews, the man who would be hiring me openly said it to my face: ”Brother, I’ll be honest with you, you are just the guy I am looking for, but if I go ahead and hire you I’ll be getting myself into trouble.” We had to go back to the town where I last worked so we could gather up our belongings and leave, and while we were there, one of our neighbors decided to report us to the police. They came straight away, and I spent that evening in custody. I cannot erase the image I have in my mind of my mother with her teary eyes. First my father, and now me… The next day I was released under judicial control. A couple of days later we changed our official address and settled down in our second hometown. Meanwhile, both my father-in-law and brother in-law were also arrested. They needed someone to look after their business and take care of things on their farm. And so, even though I knew nothing about working the soil, I found myself atop a tractor harvesting carrots on thousands of acres of land just so I could help them out somehow. Though it was difficult at first, I found that in time I grew to like it. After my brother-in-law was released and he could take over and the workload eased up a bit, I could look for jobs in my own field of work. Upon returning to Konya, after doing some odd jobs here and there, I finally started working at a printing center. Meanwhile, my father was transferred to the Alanya prison. Every once in a while I would go and visit during open visitation, but it was my mother who mostly went to the visits because of the distance and expenses involved. Someone I used to work for, and who I loved and respected dearly, vouched for me and I started working at a publishing house after the Ramadan Eid festival were over. Yes, I was working now, but only a month into it and it was time for the court hearings. The hearings took three days. I went in all three days, and I sat and listened. On the second day, before the court adjourned for the day’s lunch break, the judge turned to me and said, “Yes, let’s listen to what you have to say also.” He had the SEGBIS (Sound and Video Information System) closed down. I spoke about my work history. There was no record regarding a report filed in my name, or my name being mentioned anywhere specific, etc… Everything was running smoothly, then the judge spoke again, “Look, our own children were educated in these institutions as well,” and the prosecutor’s head bobbed slowly up and down as if affirming what the judge had just said. Then he asked me the question, “Do you think they were the ones to carry out this coup?” I knew this was a trick question, but still I fell into their trap. Rather, I should say, there were some possible answers I could have given, but I just couldn’t. (It was like Allah did not allow me to say it, I’m guessing that there is some kind of divine wisdom behind my being taken in.) My answer was (as recorded in the official report), “I do not believe that the individuals I worked with in these institutions were members of a [terrorist] organization. In fact, I do not believe they had any relations with either the December 17/25 operations or the coup attempt which took place on July 15, 2016. I am among those individuals who believe that the members of this [social] structure have not committed the act of staging a coup. I see Fethullah Gulen as a leader with a specific religious vision/perspective. I do not believe that he has engaged in any activities which aim to disintegrate any government or state. I have never been a witness to any testimonies delivered by himself to that effect. I believe that the events which took place on July 15, 2016 were forged and were false actions. I am among those who believe that such a coup was merely a stage act.” The court room was dead silent– no sound, no movement at all. The judge spoke to me, “You do understand that this is the high criminal court, you may very well be arrested.” I do not remember anything I said from that point onward. For the first time in my life, my blood sugar levels plummeted, and I felt a dizziness in my head. I held on to the railing in front of me to keep my balance. As I was about to collapse onto the floor, I lowered myself down and just sat on the floor. I asked for some water. The court clerk looked at me, eyes wide open as if to say, “What on earth did you just do!” The judge ordered the clerk to take a record of what I had said, the most significant parts at least, and said to me,”You will come back for the hearings this afternoon, and the ones tomorrow. If you fail to come on your own, I will see to it that the police make sure you come here.” “I understand your honor,” I replied. My mind was telling me right then and there that I would be arrested for sure. When I made it home at the end of the day, I told my wife all that had happened throughout the day. The next day’s hearing was a very short one. The interim decision was announced right away. I was under arrest. My first encounter was with the handcuffs. What we saw only in movies and on television had become the reality of our own lives now. As I was being taken to the hospital for the routine check-up, with permission from the police I called up my wife to inform her of what was going on. She couldn’t say anything except shed tears on the other end of the line. I don’t know whether it was from the shock of it all or just me trying to keep my calm, but there were no tears or any sense of sorrow on my end. I was finally taken to the prison. After taking my information down, the guardians casually conversed on which ward to send me to, displaying such levity as if they were playing the lottery or some other game. When I heard B11, I was all ears since my father had also been kept in that same ward. I entered the ward and looked around hoping to see a familiar face when right before me stood the general director of the institution that I had been working for. “What are you doing here?” he asked me. I told him the whole story. I admit, I did cry a little bit then. “Are you hungry, let’s fix you something to eat,” they offered right away. As I ate, all my fellow “inmates” came over to say sorry for what had happened, asked my name and started up conversations to welcome me in. I stayed in that ward for about two weeks. Even the district governor from our hometown was there. From professors in the university to former police officers, people were there from all walks of life. I don’t remember the exact date, but on one of the weekends we even had a “çiğ köfte” (traditional dish made with crushed wheat, tomato paste, herbs and spices, usually eaten as comfort food) party. We bought the supplies from the snack bar. One of our friends in the ward “kneaded” the delicacy. We prepared the “ayran” (traditional yogurt drink) and spread out our blankets in the courtyard. We ate and had a good time, we even enjoyed our tea afterwards. It was a truly extraordinary day spent in an extraordinary location. Towards the end, some friends grew so enthusiastic that they even started singing marches from Ottoman times (the Plevne march). I guess the prison guards were listening to us from the top floor because the guards immediately rushed over and shut the doors. The next day we received a written notice. Because of the march sung the day before, an investigation file was being opened on our ward. It was obvious that things were going to turn sour. A few days later the whole ward was dispersed, and everyone was sent somewhere else. We gathered in the courtyard and said our goodbyes. I cried a lot, it was a heartbreaking separation. I was sent to ward C7 with two other retired police officers. I stayed there for six weeks. It was about a quarter the size of the previous ward- -a small, tiny ward– but it was all the more sincere and warm. Like all the other wards, it was filled with educated gentlemen. From the morning until the afternoon, prayers books were read and conversations circled around the material that was read. When the afternoon prayer time rolled around, those of us who felt young gathered up and played some volleyball in the courtyard. I spent the Eid al-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice) in that ward. It was an Eid that I will never forget and will always cherish. Among my fellow inmates was a former student’s parent and a doctor who had previously stayed in the same ward with my father. A project being drawn up by the Ministry of Justice was revealed. They were planning to mix inmates like us together with criminals of petty offenses. They had chosen Konya to be the pilot prison to try out this new plan, but their plan did not operate like they had intended. So, one Tuesday morning, I was taken back to my old ward once again. This time around, the number of inmates had increased, the faces had changed, even the atmosphere felt a bit different. It didn’t feel as comfortable as it used to be. Because it was more crowded now, everything from sleeping arrangements to the long bathroom lines, felt like a big issue now. Thank God, though, despite everything, days were going by quickly, with no fights or any uproars. A couple weeks later, the Konya “Çatı” file (in which many individuals were being tried for the same crime) hearings started. Some of the inmates in our ward were also being taken to the court as part of these hearings. One day, as we were waiting for our friends to come back from the hearings, someone had slid open the window opening on the ward door, asking for me. I had been outside in the courtyard while this was happening, and I rushed to the door when they said my father was calling for me. I was in shock. I couldn’t believe my eyes. It had been months since I had last seen my father, and now he was standing right across from me. I held his hand so tightly, and we talked for a bit. He looked around at my ward and greeted some of the familiar faces he saw, and then all of a sudden they shut the window. It turns out they had secretly opened the window when waiting in the corridor. His friends had kept watch and covered for him. (I tried to illustrate this in the drawing No.24) This was bound to happen when his petition to have us stay in the same ward was turned down. When his petitions were left unanswered, he asked to meet in person with the director, and at last they were able to come to an agreement. One Friday, shortly after the noontime prayers (by the way, because our activities were always centered around the prayer times, when speaking about the time, the vocabulary naturally turned to expressions such as “after this prayer,” “before that prayer,” etc..) as I was reading from the Qur’an, the doors opened. There, standing at the door was my father, holding his belongings. I yelled out, “Father!” and reached towards him as he stepped inside. I learned later that when I cried out like that, one of my fellow inmates started crying because he hadn’t seen his own father for months. It was heartbreaking to hear. Yet, happily for us, we had been united, father and son in the same ward. The last month passed by very quickly. Meanwhile, on the one hand, I was drawing my sketches of what life was like behind bars. On the other hand, I was getting ready for my court hearing. There was an inmate friend who had been a court clerk. I would consult with him, and we would exchange ideas on how I should go about my defense. All the while, my inmate friends would bring over pictures of their spouses, children, mothers and fathers, asking me to transform the pictures into a drawing for them. I did not want to break any of their hearts, so I would take them and work on them as well. On one of those days, I remember I had worked on five different pictures, one after the other, no break. Why they all waited until my last week there beats me! On Saturday, my group was on night duty; on Sunday, I was part of the cleaning crew. I was so beat that the “big brother” of the ward (when I say “big brother” don’t imagine the kind you see in the movies who racketeers money from the other inmates; he was truly a guy who looked out for us and took care of our needs.) felt sorry for me and backed me up saying, ”Why are you guys working this poor kid so much, ease up on him. He’s being released tomorrow!” Monday afternoon I appeared at the court hearing and returned back to the ward towards the evening, a little after the nightly roll-call. Everyone’s eyes were wide open, staring at me with questioning eyes. “RELEASE!” I yelled out and an excited uproar broke out. We celebrated with whistles and applause and congratulations all around. I told everyone how it all went down. After the nightly prayer, I said my goodbyes and left for home. I must have been the only inmate who found it so hard to leave their prison ward, because it also meant I was being separated from my father–again. As I stepped out, I turned and said, “See you Wednesday.” Some of them looked at me with a puzzled expression, but then it hit them that it was open visitation on Wednesday! I would be coming to see my father, as a visitor this time!

WHY I DREW THESE PICTURES

The year I started my university education, I considered dropping out, and on not just one, but three separate occasions. In fact, on my third attempt, I even made it as far as the door of the Student Affairs office (and turned back around, of course). It was an environment that I just couldn’t get used to. I felt like I was in a completely different world. People were so relaxed, so occupied with themselves, not stopping to look around at other people and just going about their own (selfish) lives. As for the professors, they were on a whole different planet, so to speak. I felt like I was a foreign student from a faraway land. As I was about to open the door of the Student Affairs office, a thought hit me, just like that, “If I came all the way here, somehow, some way, then there must be a reason for it.” And at that moment, I decided against leaving. If I had dropped out of school, I would never have become a teacher; if I hadn’t become a teacher, my work permit would never have been canceled for such an arbitrary reason, I would never have had a criminal case opened in my name, I would never have been locked up behind bars, I would never have had the opportunity to meet so many amazing people in prison, never have had the memories which I portray in my drawings to share with you… The first thought that came to my mind after I was put in prison was, “Well, I finally get to have a vacation.” One of my inmate friends who was an assistant professor in the field of physics (I keep referring back to the people I met in prison. I can’t help it, because they are all such special and precious individuals whom I cherish. I had always heard about how the friendships formed in the military and in prison were unforgettable, now I know by experience.) said to me, “Brother, I never had a chance to get a tattoo when I was outside, would you draw a dragon tattoo on my shoulder?” I couldn’t say no to such a wish, so I drew one, using a pen. A few days later, a group of friends chatting in the courtyard caught my attention, and I was moved to make a drawing of them (note picture No.18). In fact, one of my friends in the prison wanted to keep the drawing as a memory, so I gifted it to him. A colleague of mine, who had also been my director and who had first welcomed me into the ward, saw the work I did and said to me, “If you ask me, you should draw all that you can to portray what it is like in here, show them in your drawings. A day will come when justice will be sought in the courts. Just as there was a way into all of this, there will be a way out.. When that day comes, everyone should be able to see what we went through.” Upon his advice, I started observing all the activities going on about me more intently, such as the roll-call in the ward, the bathroom line, the “snack bar” day, open visitations, what the ward looked like on a regular day, etc..and I stored everything in my memory. I even felt the need to apologize to my wife one evening. “What are you apologizing for?” she asked me. “I didn’t pay much attention to you during visitation,” I replied. “I was busy observing all that was going on around us so I could store them in my memory and get it down in my drawings.” I drew all that I could find time for while I was still “inside” and the rest of the drawings, I completed after my release. Whenever some friends ask me whether there’s anything new, I give a vague answer and say, “I’m working on it…” Months ago, when I did share a couple of my drawings, they somehow got passed back and forth among friends wanting to share with their close ones, and all of a sudden I had become an anonymous artist on social media. Whenever I started working on anything new, my inmate friends would joke around, saying, “Don’t forget to draw me too bro!” and would always support me. One of my friends in ward C7 said to me, “Brother, whatever you see here, try and carry it all as best you can onto your drawings. We try and do the best we can to pour out our hearts, to write down our memories, our poems, our homesickness and our experiences as best we can, but what you can express through your drawings can only be expressed through pages and pages of writing and still not be as effective.” (The person saying this to me was a professor who had authored the only book written in his own specific field of study.) When I had returned to my previous ward and got to meet new people and form new friendships, I had the opportunity to get to know them and listen to their stories as well. When I told them about my interest in drawing, the first thing they would ask me would be, “Brother, have you drawn pictures about our life here?” and I would rush and bring my drawings to show them. They would admire the drawings and grow emotional. One of them even said, “I keep telling my wife about how we even wash dishes and do laundry and clean and mop, but she blows me off telling me not to exaggerate. If I showed her this, she certainly wouldn’t be so cynical anymore.” The smile that would appear on the faces of those looking at the drawings, it was truly something invaluable, priceless; it meant more to me than the wealth of the worlds. A brother who looked at the pictures said, “Brother, you truly have found your calling here.” I was walking on clouds that day. I was so filled with joy– it felt like I was literally flying. I went to bed late that night. I stayed up, working on my drawings. I thought to myself, “I wish I could change wards every week and be able to draw the uniqueness being experienced in each one of them.” With these thoughts running through my head, I have tried to take notes of all the moments and memories I stored in my heart and mind. Unfortunately, there were some drawings that I could not finish to include in this book. I hope and pray that I have been able to duly portray the atmosphere we all experienced on the “inside.” I thank God that He put me in there. I got to experience unforgettable memories, and I got to know unforgettable people while I was in there. And I was blessed to experience some of the most delicious food I have ever tasted in my life, like the menemen (traditional breakfast dish made with eggs, tomatoes, and peppers) our friends had prepared for us on the semaver (traditional tea pot) during our Eid al-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice) celebratory breakfast.

If I were a swallow flapping
his winds at the setting sun,

If I ripped out the pages
of my life and started anew

If swung my prayer beads through every
inch of the concrete courtyard I walked
on, while saying a prayer for each new
day, hoping this would end one day

If I raised my hands a bit higher each day,
for you, and my family, and your children

If I begged and pleaded as
my hands touched the ceiling of
the ward, would you, o brother, give me
a handful of your freedom?

I raise my hands up
to my Lord, and I pray,

Please don’t silence this
melody before its day.

These tribulations
shall surely be no more,

As the whole world
will witness one day..

 

 

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KEY HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN TURKEY SINCE THE SO-CALLED COUP ATTEMPT

Following the so-called coup attempt on the 15th of July 2016, the Turkish government under the authoritarian leadership of Recep Tayyip Erdogan has taken a wave of oppressive actions against not only the alleged coup plotters but also those that are perceived as critics of the regime. Currently, as part of Turkey’s post-coup crackdown, more than 130,000 people including judges, academics, teachers, journalists, police and military officers, and other public servants have been dismissed from their jobs. In correlation, more than 217,000 have been detained and 160,000 have been arrested. Amnesty International reports that detainees were “being held arbitrarily” with “no evidence establishing reasonable suspicion of criminal behavior” and that “only a tiny minority of them were accused of taking part in the actual events of the attempted coup”.

Amid the massive crackdown of hundreds of thousands of dissidents, human rights organizations and the U.N. Human Rights Council have noted that human rights are violated on a large scale by the Turkish government. Arbitrary killings, suspicious deaths of people in custody, forced disappearances, tortures, ill-treatments, injustice, and threats – mostly against the followers of the Gulen Movement, Kurds, and the Leftists – have been reported widespread during this large-scale witch-hunt.

As people continue to be arrested and many more tortured and abducted, the present brief of Advocates of Silenced Turkey (AST) highlights some of the key human rights concerns that have taken place in Turkey during this on-going period.

●  UNPRECEDENTED SCALE OF DISMISSALS: 

More than 130,000 public servants, with their names attached in lists to emergency orders, were dismissed by emergency decrees. These public servants included over 4,463 judges and prosecutors, 6,021 academics, 6,000 health-care professionals, 33,500 teachers, and 44,500 police and military officers. Not only were people dismissed arbitrarily but also banned permanently from working in the public sector – many were even banned to practice their profession.

  • COLLAPSE OF JUDICIARY SYSTEM:

With approximately 4,463 judges and prosecutors (including two judges from the Turkey’s highest court) dismissed permanently, over one-fifth of Turkey’s judiciary has been removed. Of those dismissed, at least 2,200 were jailed with their assets frozen due to their alleged links to the Gulen movement. Consequently, the climate of fear paralyzed the judges and prosecutors who still have their positions. The fear combined with the heavy government influence in the court system led to the collapse of the judiciary system and the deterioration of human rights in the country. As a result, Turkey ranked 109 out of 126 countries in 2019 on the rule of law index of the World Justice Project.

  • VICTIMIZATION OF LAWYERS:

Lawyers are among the many groups affected by the post-coup crackdown in Turkey. They were unlawfully associated with their clients’ alleged crimes. Human Rights Watch (HRW) reported that many lawyers were targeted with criminal investigations with little or no evidence. According to the Arrested Lawyers Initiative, over 1,500 lawyers were persecuted over the past three years including 14 lawyers who were presidents of provincial bar associations – of those persecuted lawyers, one third remained imprisoned before and during their trials, and 274 were convicted of membership of armed terrorist organizations and sentenced to long prison sentences. Furthermore, approximately 34 bar associations were shut down by presidential decree with alleged affiliations to terrorist organizations.

  • PERSECUTION OF ACADEMICS:

Following the coup attempt, 3,003 private schools and 15 universities linked to the Gülen movement were closed by a presidential decree. Eventually resulting in the displacement of over 60,000 students across the country. Over 8,500 academics reportedly lost their jobs either due to direct dismissals or university closures since September 2016 – and many of them were imprisoned. Large-scale dismissals of academics and teachers significantly damaged the education sector thus diminished the right to education.

  • BOOKS DESTROYED:

Turkey’s education minister Ziya Selçuk announced last week that 301,878 books had been destroyed as the government cracks down on anything linked to Fethullah Gülen. Turkish newspaper BirGün reported that 1.8m textbooks had been destroyed and reprinted for containing the “objectionable” word Pennsylvania, which is where Gülen lives.

  • THE MEDIA PURGE FOLLOWING THE ATTEMPTED COUP: 

In the aftermath of the failed coup, the government closed down 200 media outlets – including 53 newspapers, 37 radio stations, 34 TV channels, 29 publishing houses, 20 magazines, and six news agencies – with accused links to the Gulen movement, Kurdish opposition, or Leftists groups. Consequently, a total of 2,308 media workers and journalists have lost their jobs. The government canceled hundreds of press accreditations and revoked passports of an unknown number of journalists and their family members to ban them from traveling abroad. In addition, the government imprisoned a record-breaking number of journalists in the wake of the coup attempt – with that, Turkey became the world’s largest prison for journalists. The Platform for Independent Journalism (P24) reported that at least 126 journalists and media workers were in prison in Turkey as of October 2019 – among them, many were put in long solitary confinement. 

The absence of freedom of expression is not only a recurring problem for journalists but for citizens as well. In 2018, the Ministry of Interior reported that more than 7,000 individuals were detained for their social media posts after investigating 631,233 digital materials. In relation to the censorships and content restrictions in the country, Wikipedia has been blocked in Turkey since April of 2017. Currently, out of the 180 countries, Turkey ranks 157th on the Press Freedom Index of Reporters Without Borders and is listed among ‘not free’ countries by the Freedom House.

  • CRACKDOWN ON HEALTH CARE SECTOR:

Turkish government has shut down 14 hospitals and 36 medical centers after the coup attempt on the pretext of alleged ties to the Gülen movement. Therefore, an estimated 21,000 health care professionals were laid off – including doctors, academics, nurses, midwives, and other hospital staff. Of those, 5,261 are medical doctors and academics who specialize in the medical sciences. The figures of how many health care professionals have been detained, arrested or currently in prison are estimated in the thousands. Given the longstanding issue of hospital and staff shortages in the country, the dismissals of health care professionals and the closure of hospitals left many patients in despair of medical care.

  • PRISON CONDITIONS:

With the persecution of tens of thousands of critics, the current population in Turkish prisons is 4-5 times higher than the normal capacity – it has increased from 171,267 inmates in 2015 to 260,144 in 2018. Given the capacity of 211,766, inmates are forced to remain in overcrowded cells. In order to free up space for more political prisoners, the government released nearly 34,000 convicts from prisons. The inadequate provision of health care to prisoners also remains a serious problem. Officially reported by the Ministry of Justice Prison and Correctional Facilities, there were 271 doctors serving nearly a quarter-million of the prison population – of whom, only eight were full-time. Insufficient access to freshwater, proper heating, ventilation, and lighting are other concerns for prison conditions. There are 62,669 political prisoners, 4,000 of them being women and 780 of them being children.

  • TORTURE AND ILL-TREATMENT:

Despite the government’s zero-tolerance claim for torture policy, human rights groups have reported widespread and systematic use of torture and ill-treatment in police custody following the coup-attempt – including severe beatings, threats of sexual assault and actual sexual assault, electric shocks, waterboarding, sleep deprivation, stress positions, long solitary confinement, and depriving of food and water. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) stated acts of torture and ill-treatment aimed “at extracting confessions or forcing detainees to denounce other Individuals” in its report on Turkey in 2017. The Human Rights Association (HRA) reported that the number of incidents where prisoners were subjected to torture and ill-treatment in detention centers and prisons was 2,178 in 2016, 2,415 in 2017, and 1,505 in 2018. The Stockholm Center for Freedom (SCF) reported a total of 126 suspicious deaths and suicides since the coup attempt – most of those occurred in detention centers and prisons, seemingly a direct result of torture and ill-treatment.

  • ABDUCTIONS AND ENFORCED DISAPPEARANCES:

In the aftermath of the coup attempt, forced disappearances made a comeback in Turkey. Opposing politicians and respected human rights groups claimed at least 128 abductions or possible enforced disappearances of individuals. Most of the victims were identified as dismissed public servants with alleged ties to the Gulen movement or critics of the government. Allegedly, victims were abducted outside detention facilities and illegally questioned and tortured by Turkey’s intelligence agency. Moreover, Turkey’s intelligence agency reportedly abducted over more than 100 alleged Gulen affiliates from 18 countries – individuals often deported illegally – against the universal conventions – by cooperative governments without due process.

  • WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN PRISON:

The prison conditions for women and children are exceedingly alarming. According to the Justice Ministry, as of 2017, nearly 10,000 women and 3,000 children under 18 are in Turkey’s prisons. The inhumane prison conditions also hold weight in women prisons. They face additional issues of the male security staff frequently obstructing their privacy during hospital visits, oftentimes leading to an incomplete examination.  Among the prisoners, there are more than 30 pregnant women or women who just gave birth and 780 children under 6 years old imprisoned along with their mothers – including 149 infants under 1-year-old. Pregnant women are forced to stay with other inmates in overcrowded cells, also denied access to proper prenatal care – posing serious risks to their well-being. Likewise, mothers with children are also forced to share a cell with inmates.

Even when prison authorities are willing to let the child see a doctor, they do not allow mothers to accompany them. Children have to sleep in the same bed with their mothers and are not assigned a cradle or a separate bed.

The state pays $2 a day per prisoner for food. Since children are not technically incarcerated, they are not allotted any daily food rations and share their mother’s meals.

More than %80 of children in jail with their mothers do not receive any education.

Only %18 receive kindergarten or nursery services, but even then, there is a shortage of educational materials.

  • RESTRICTIONS ON RIGHT TO TRAVEL:

Another unlawful activity being pursued during this period is revoking the passports of government critics with perceived affiliations to the Gulen movement, Kurdish opposition, Leftists groups and their family members. On this ground, the Turkish government put restrictions on approximately 155,000 passports, reported by the SCF. Since their passports are restricted, many people, with the fear of persecution, use smuggler routes to flee from the country. Unfortunately, many died in the Evros River and the Aegean Sea. Turkey revoking its citizens’ passports also causes travel struggles for those across the world.

  • SEIZURE OF DISSIDENTS’ ASSETS:

The Turkish government abuses laws to seize assets of its critics. As of March 2018, the government had seized the assets of approximately 1,124 businesses and 127 individuals. According to the Savings Deposit Insurance Fund of Turkey, the net worth of the seized assets is an estimated $32.24 billion since the 2016 coup attempt. Moreover, in most cases, the government freezes the assets of those on trial, financially crippling them and their families.

SOURCES

  1. https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2016/07/turkey-independent-monitors-must-be-allowed-to-access-detainees-amid-torture-allegations/ https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries/europe-and-central-asia/turkey/report-turkey/
  2. https://www.state.gov/reports/2018-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/turkey/

          https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/TR/2018-03-19_Second_OHCHR_Turkey_Report.pdf

  1. https://turkeypurge.com/turkey-jails-2431-judges-prosecutors-dismisses-4424-to-date-top-court
  2. https://worldjusticeproject.org/sites/default/files/documents/ROLI-2019-Reduced.pdf
  3. https://silencedturkey.org/lawyers-on-trial-abusive-prosecutions-and-erosion-of-fair-trial-rights-in-turkey-2

         https://arrestedlawyers.org/2019/09/01/new-report-mass-prosecution-of-lawyers-in-turkey/

  1. http://silencedturkey.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/AcademicsAtRisk.pdf
  2. https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/aug/06/turkish-government-destroys-more-than-300000-books
  3. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/11/brothers-critical-turkish-regime-arrested-after-tv-programme

         https://tr.euronews.com/2019/07/12/verilerle-15-temmuz-sonras-ve-ohal-sureci

  1. https://expressioninterrupted.com/freedom-of-expression-and-the-press-in-turkey-211/
  2. https://www.state.gov/reports/2018-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/turkey/
  3. http://www.tuik.gov.tr/PreHaberBultenleri.do?id=27610

          https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/turkey-coup-attempt-latest-releases-almost-34000-prisoners-in-amnesty-amid-international-alarm-over-a7221451.html

  1. https://www.state.gov/reports/2018-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/turkey/
  2. https://www.ihd.org.tr/sample-page-2/
  1. https://stockholmcf.org/suspicious-deaths-and-suicides-in-turkey-updated-list/
  2. https://correctiv.org/en/top-stories-en/2018/12/06/black-sites/
  3. http://www.tuik.gov.tr/PreHaberBultenleri.do?id=27610

         https://7dnews.com/news/inmates-facing-poor-living-conditions-and-death-in-turkish-prisons

  1. https://stockholmcf.org/turkeys-dismissed-academics-want-their-passports-back-after-state-of-emergency-lifted/
  2. https://twitter.com/platformpj/status/1234421262052732928/photo/1

         http://www.platformpj.org/report-the-erosion-of-property-rights-in-turkey/

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AST REPORT 2018-2019

WORDS FROM THE ADVOCATES

When the Turkish President declared in an infamous speech that “old Turkey no longer exists. This Turkey is new Turkey”, the story of Turkish authoritarianism had once and for all taken on a new character. Since July of 2016, the Turkish government has improperly imprisoned 130,214 homemakers, teachers, NGO workers, academics, judges, prosecutors, and journalists.

We are a group of lawyers, judges, academics, journalists, and hundreds of activists who cherish democratic ideals and universal human rights. We are prisoners of conscience wanted by the Erdogan’s regime, relatives of political prisoners, and victims who have lost their jobs, property, and family members to the current administration which has been described as a Mafia State. We are the Advocates of Silenced Turkey. We, the Advocates, have made it our mission to champion the rights of Silenced Turkey until universal human rights and democratic governance are established and sustained as the utmost priorities of the Republic of Turkey.

AST GIVES A VOICE TO THE VOICELESS…

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December 10th, International Human Rights Day Booklet

DECEMBER 10th, INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS DAY Booklet

10 aralık insan hakları gününde yüzlerce insan hakları gönüllülerinin destekleriyle 17 Farklı yerde yapılan aktivitelerin bir özetini sunan bu kitapçıkta bir çok demokratik protesto aktivitesi yer almaktadır. İnsan hakları ihlallerinin bir an evvel dinmesi için gayret gösteren gönüllülerimize teşekkür ederiz.

 

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Vigil and Protest for 864 Babies In Jail in Turkey

864 Babies are in Jail Protests Booklet

The imprisonment of babies is just one element of the Turkish government’s crackdown on innocent people. Approximately 217,000 people have been detained and more than 82,000 people have been arrested on terrorism charges. Those prosecuted include journalists, civil servants, teachers, politicians, academics, human rights defenders, police officers, and military personnel. The prosecutions often lack compelling evidence of criminal activity. As a result, government officials use torture and ill-treatment in custody, including severe beatings, threats of sexual assault and actual sexual assault, electric shocks, waterboarding and interference with medical examinations.

 

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State department human rights report on Turkey 2013-2017

State Department human rights report on Turkey 2013-2017

 

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State Department report on human rights violations in Turkey-2018

State Department report on human rights violations in Turkey-2018

 

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AST Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly April 15

Download as pdf: AST_Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly_April 15

Turkey’s Human Rights Violations | 04/08/2019-04/15/2019

1-“Election authority says elected mayors not to be given mandate if they are purge victims”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/10/election-authority-says-elected-mayors-not-to-be-given-mandate-if-they-are-purge-victims/

2-“Turkey’s Erdoğan urges Sudan to operate under ‘normal democratic process”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/11/turkeys-erdogan-urges-sudan-to-operate-under-normal-democratic-process/

3-“Video game portrays opposition mayoral candidate’s quest for mandate”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/11/video-game-portrays-opposition-mayoral-candidates-quest-for-mandate/

4-“Wives of jailed police chiefs who exposed corruption given lengthy prison sentences”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/10/wives-of-jailed-police-chiefs-who-exposed-corruption-given-lengthy-prison-sentences/

5-‘’Jailed woman forced to go through labor for two days in handcuffs”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/10/jailed-woman-forced-to-go-through-labor-for-two-days-in-handcuffs/

6-“HRW: Turkey has arbitrarily jailed hundreds of lawyers since 2016 coup”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/10/hrw-turkey-has-arbitrarily-jailed-hundreds-of-lawyers-since-2016-coup/

7-“Turkey orders detention of 292 people over Gülen links: report”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/09/turkey-orders-detention-of-292-people-over-gulen-links-report/

8-European rights court orders Turkey to compensate citizen held in police custody when he was 8
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/09/european-rights-court-orders-turkey-to-compensate-citizen-held-in-police-custody-when-he-was-8/

9-“Convicted coup suspect says he was victim of that night”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/08/convicted-coup-suspect-says-he-was-victim-of-that-night/

10-“Erdoğan’s targeting of journalist goes unnoticed: ‘Public got used to it’ former editor says”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/07/erdogans-targeting-of-journalist-goes-unnoticed-public-got-used-to-it-former-editor-says/

11-“Ministry says purged staff cannot be reinstated unless family member is acquitted’”
https://turkeypurge.com/ministry-says-purged-staff-cannot-be-reinstated-unless-family-member-is-acquitted

12-“HRW: Bar associations in Europe, US, Canada should advocate for lawyers in Turkey”
https://turkeypurge.com/white-house-must-stand-up-to-erdogans-politically-motivated-detentions-us-senator-says

13-‘’Detention warrants issued for 292 people over Gulen links”
https://turkeypurge.com/detention-warrants-issued-for-292-people-over-gulen-links

14-“Wives of police chiefs who led 2013 corruption operations sentenced to 6 years in prison”
https://turkeypurge.com/wives-of-police-chiefs-who-led-2013-corruption-operations-sentenced-to-6-years-in-prison

15-“Pro-Erdogan mafia boss says will take to the streets if the government asks”
https://turkeypurge.com/pro-erdogan-mafia-boss-says-will-take-to-the-streets-if-the-government-asks

16-‘’Mayor-elect purged teacher denied certificate of election by electoral council: report”
https://turkeypurge.com/mayor-elect-purged-teacher-denied-certificate-of-election-by-electoral-council-report

17-“First-Ever Comprehensive Biography on Fethullah Gülen”
https://hizmetnews.com/24806/first-ever-comprehensive-biography-on-fethullah-gulen/#.XLClfLfYrnE

18. “300 purge victim judges, prosecutors barred from obtaining law licenses: report”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2019/04/11/300-purge-victim-judges-prosecutors-barred-from-obtaining-law-licenses-report/

19. “ 9 purge-victim mayor-elects denied mandate by Turkey’s election authority”
https://turkeypurge.com/9-purge-victim-mayor-elects-denied-mandate-by-turkeys-election-authority

20. “Berkin Elvan’ın vurulduğu yerde 6 yıl sonra keşif”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/berkin-elvanin-vuruldugu-yerde-6-yil-sonra-kesif-h130907

21. “Yandaşta kavga başladı: ‘Reis’çilere ‘Zübükzade’ benzetmesi”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/yandasta-kavga-basladi-reiscilere-zubukzade-benzetmesi-h130911.html

22. “Rabia Naz’ın babası akıl hastanesine yatırılıyor”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/rabia-nazin-babasi-akil-hastanesine-yatiriliyor-h130908.html

23. “Meriç Nehri’nde sonlanan genç, coşkulu ve neşeli bir hayat”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/meric-nehrinde-sonlanan-genc-coskulu-ve-neseli-bir-hayat-h130875.html

24. “Akın İpek’in iade davasında İngiltere’den Türkiye’ye ikinci ret”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/akin-ipekin-iade-davasinda-ingiltereden-turkiyeye-ikinci-ret-h130873.html

25. ‘’Gazeteci İbrahim Karayeğen, koğuş arkadaşı Ahmet Altan’ı anlattı”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/gazeteci-ibrahim-karayegen-kogus-arkadasi-ahmet-altani-anlatti-h130987.html

26. “Karikatürist Carlos Latuff, Türkiye’deki tutuklu hamile kadınları çizdi”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/karikaturist-carlos-latuff-turkiyedeki-tutuklu-hamile-kadinlari-cizdi-h130986.html

27. ‘’Babasında Bylock olduğu gerekçesiyle kızına 6 yıl 3 ay ceza verildi”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/babasinda-bylock-oldugu-gerekcesiyle-kizina-6-yil-3-ay-ceza-verildi-h130959.html

28. ‘’Hastanede skandal; tutuklu kadına, kelepçeli doğum!”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/hastanede-skandal-tutuklu-kadina-kelepceli-dogum-h130867.html

29. “KHK ile ihraç 59 polis hakkında daha gözaltı kararı”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/khk-ile-ihrac-59-polis-hakkinda-daha-gozalti-karari-h130850.html

30. “Erdoğan’ın yeni köşkü için inşaat başladı”
http://www.tr724.com/erdoganin-yeni-kosku-icin-insaat-basladi/

31. “Birçok ilde ‘cadı avı’ operasyonu: 288 gözaltı kararı”
http://www.tr724.com/bircok-ilde-cadi-avi-operasyonu-288-gozalti-karari/

32. “AKP gündeme getirdi; Büyükçekmece’de ‘sahte seçmen’ operasyonu başladı”
http://www.tr724.com/akp-gundeme-getirdi-buyukcekmecede-sahte-secmen-operasyonu-basladi/

33. “Profesyonel infazı böyle tarif etti: “Cinayet Türkiye için yeni bir Susurluk’tur”
http://www.tr724.com/profesyonel-infazi-boyle-tarif-etti-cinayet-turkiye-icin-yeni-bir-susurluktur/

34. “Tedavi için dışarıda olması gereken Avşin bebeğe mahkemeden ret!”
http://www.tr724.com/tedavi-icin-disarida-olmasi-gereken-avsin-bebege-mahkemeden-ret/

35. ”Türkiye genelinde 280 kişi için gözaltı kararı”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/turkiye-genelinde-280-kisi-icin-gozalti-karari-h130849.html

36. “Hekimlerle derdiniz ne?”
http://www.tr724.com/hekimlerle-derdiniz-ne/

37. “Zindana açık mektup: Hakkını helal et bacım!”
http://www.tr724.com/zindana-acik-mektup-hakkini-helal-et-bacim/

38. “Sippenhaft –aile boyu “suç”
http://www.tr724.com/sippenhaft-aile-boyu-suc/

39. “Çocuklarınız sizden utanacak”
http://www.tr724.com/cocuklariniz-sizden-utanacak/

40. “Mahir Mete Kul’un hikâyesi”
http://www.tr724.com/mahir-mete-kulun-hikayesi/

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AST Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly January 20

Download as pdf: AST_Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly_January 13

Turkey’s Human Rights Violations | 01/13/2019-01/20/2019

1-” Enes Kanter eager for Knicks return after ‘boring’ spell as TV viewer”
https://nypost.com/2019/01/21/enes-kanter-eager-for-knicks-return-after-boring-spell-as-tv-viewer/

2-“Enes Kanter’s concerns about potential assassination over political views taken ‘very seriously’by NBA”
https://www.foxnews.com/sports/enes-kanters-concerns-about-potential-assassination-over-political-views-taken-very-seriously-by-nba

3- New York Knicks Star Enes Kanter’s Assassination Fears: ‘Erdogan’s Long Arm Is Everywhere’
https://www.thedailybeast.com/new-york-knicks-star-enes-kanters-assassination-fears-erdogans-long-arm-is-everywhere

4- Thunder center Enes Kanter has arrest warrant in Turkey, accused of being part of terrorist group
https://www.sbnation.com/2017/5/26/15701832/enes-kanter-arrest-warrant-terrorist-turkey-thunder-nba-gulen-erdogan

5- Enes Kanter fears about his homeland are ‘delusions’, says former NBA player Hedo Turkoglu
https://www.skysports.com/nba/news/36226/11601632/enes-kanter-fears-about-his-homeland-are-delusions-says-former-nba-player-hedo-turkoglu

6- Spurning Erdogan’s Vision, Turks Leave in Droves, Draining Money and Talent
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/02/world/europe/turkey-emigration-erdogan.html

7- New York Knicks’ Enes Kanter brands Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan ‘Alunatic’, says he fears for his life
https://www.newsweek.com/enes-kanter-turkish-government-recep-tayyip-erdogan-new-york-knicks-nba-1280375

8- Turkish TV watchdog orders halt to show over actors’ remarks on Erdoğan
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/turkish-tv-watchdog-orders-halt-to-show-over-actors-remarks-on-erdogan-140055

9- HSBC’s Turkish boss is probed by police for Hitler insult to country’s leader Recep Erdogan
https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-6545603/HSBCs-Turkish-boss-probed-police-Hitler-insult-countrys-leader-Recep-Erdogan.html

10- Turkish Comedy Veterans in Court After TV Attack Riles Erdogan
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-24/turkish-comedy-veterans-in-court-after-tv-attack-riles-erdogan

11- Kurdish protesters attacked by Erdoğan’s bodyguards at DC demonstration sue Turkish government
https://www.pri.org/stories/2019-01-18/kurdish-protesters-attacked-erdo-ans-bodyguards-dc-demonstration-sue-turkish

12- NBA’s Kanter urges Trump to act on Turkey’s human rights record
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-turkey-security-gulen-kanter/nbas-kanter-urges-trump-to-act-on-turkeys-human-rights-record-idUSKCN1PB268

13- Turkey reportedly seeking warrant for Knicks’ Enes Kanter over ‘terror’ claims
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2019/jan/16/enes-kanter-turkey-arrest-warrant-nba-recep-tayyip-erdogan

14- Why Turkey is seeking an international arrest warrant for Knicks’ Enes Kanter
https://www.sbnation.com/nba/2019/1/7/18172721/enes-kanter-arrest-warrant-travel-london-knicks-wizards-turkey-president

15- Turkey Issues Yet Another Arrest Warrant for Enes Kanter
https://sports.vice.com/en_us/article/a3m5pp/turkey-issues-yet-another-arrest-warrant-for-enes-kanter-erdogan

16- NBA New York Knicks player Enes Kanter is a wanted man in Turkey. Here’s why
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-17/new-york-knicks-enes-kanter-a-wanted-man-in-turkey-heres-why/10721890

17- ‘I didn’t feel safe’: NBA star Enes Kanter skips London game over Turkey assassination fears
https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/kanter-erdogan-turkey-nba-1.4984599

18- “Turkey orders arrest of 100 soldiers over alleged links to Muslim cleric accused of orchestrating coup attempt”
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/turkey-soldiers-arrest-fethullah-gulen-coup-erdogan-muslim-cleric-president-a8722426.html

19- “Turkish men ‘face torture’ after being extradited from Malaysia as post-coup crackdown continues”
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/turkey-coup-attempt-erdogan-gulen-hizmet-movement-crackdown-malaysia-arrests-extradited-karaman-a7733276.html

20- “Turkey sentences detained judge who won human rights award to 10 years, Anadolu says”
https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/turkey-sentences-detained-judge-who-won-human-rights-award-to-10-years–anadolu-says-11141758

21- “Man detained by Turkey for ‘liking’ anti-Erdogan Facebook post”
http://www.rudaw.net/english/middleeast/turkey/20012019

22- “Jailed Turkish philanthropist Osman Kavala to be nominated for Nobel Peace Prize”
https://ahvalnews.com/osman-kavala/jailed-turkish-philanthropist-osman-kavala-be-nominated-nobel-peace-prize

23- “Daily chart Turkey leads the world in jailed journalists”
https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2019/01/16/turkey-leads-the-world-in-jailed-journalists

24- “Turkish Prosecutors Seek Arrest of the Knicks’ Enes Kanter”
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/16/sports/basketball/knicks-enes-kanter-turkey-arrest-warrant.html

Erdogan Hukumeti tarafından işlenenen İnsan Hakları İhlalleri

25- “45 günlük bebek annesiyle birlikte cezaevine konuldu”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/45-gunluk-bebek-annesiyle-birlikte-cezaevine-konuldu-h127508.html

26- ”OHAL bitti ama baskılar bitmedi, uyduruk gerekçelerle tutuklamalar devam ediyor”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/ohal-bitti-ama-baskilar-bitmedi-uyduruk-gerekcelerle-tutuklamalar-devam-ediyor-h127501.html

27- “TMSF, hukuksuzca gasp edilen şirketlerin satışına başladı”
http://aktifhaber.com/ekonomi/tmsf-hukuksuzca-gasp-edilen-sirketlerin-satisina-basladi-h127497.html

28- “Cadı avı yaşlı ve hastaları da dinlemiyor: 72 yaşındaki hastayı tutukladılar”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/cadi-avi-yasli-ve-hastalari-da-dinlemiyor-72-yasindaki-hastayi-tutukladilar-h127335.html

29- “Hukuksuzca Gasp Edilen Şirketlerin Değeri 56.5 Milyar TL”
http://aktifhaber.com/ekonomi/hukuksuzca-gasp-edilen-sirketlerin-degeri-565-milyar-lira-h127358.html

30- “Türkiye’de insan hakları ihlali olmadığından emin misiniz Leyla Hanım!”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/turkiyede-insan-haklari-ihlali-olmadigindan-emin-misiniz-leyla-hanim-h127362.html

31- “28 Şubat’tan 15 Temmuz’a başörtülü bir hemşirenin hikayesi…”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/28-subattan-15-temmuza-basortulu-bir-hemsirenin-hikayesi-h127387.html

32- “Cezaevinden çıkan kadınlar anlattı: ‘Cezaevinde hamile ya da çocuklu olmak rehineliğe dönüştü”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/cezaevinden-cikan-kadinlar-anlatti-cezaevinde-hamile-ya-da-cocuklu-olmak-rehinelige-donustu-h127396.html

33- “Türkiye, NBA oyuncusu Enes Kanter hakkında kırmızı bülten talebinde bulundu”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/turkiye-nba-oyuncusu-enes-kanter-hakkinda-kirmizi-bulten-talebinde-bulundu-h127402.html

34- “MİT’in adam kaçırma operasyonları dünya basınında”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/mitin-adam-kacirma-operasyonlari-dunya-basininda-h127415.html

35- “Şeker Piliç’in sahipleri tutuklandı”
http://aktifhaber.com/genel/seker-pilicin-sahipleri-tutuklandi-h127425.html

36- “Çok sayıda cezaevinde aynı anda soğukla işkence başladı”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/cok-sayida-cezaevinde-ayni-anda-sogukla-iskence-basladi-h127444.html

37- “Hapishanede öldürülen Halime Gülsu’nun son mektubu”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/hapishanede-oldurulen-halime-gulsunun-son-mektubu-h127449.html

38- “’12 yaşındaki oğlum bile sorgulandı, 25 yıl önceki programdan tutuklandım’”
http://www.shaber3.com/12-yasindaki-oglum-bile-sorgulandi-25-yil-onceki-programdan-tutuklandim-haberi/1318013/

39- “Amerikalı gazeteci: Diktatörünüz sahte bir darbe sahneledi ve kullandı”
http://aktifhaber.com/dunya/amerikali-gazeteci-diktatorunuz-sahte-bir-darbe-sahneledi-ve-kullandi-h127628.html

40- “Anneleri sordu: 5 günlük er Ahmet ve kekeme Recep mi darbeci?”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/anneleri-sordu-5-gunluk-er-ahmet-ve-kekeme-recep-mi-darbeci-h127289.html#

41- “Cezaevinden çıkan kadınlar anlattı: ‘Cezaevinde hamile ya da çocuklu olmak rehineliğe dönüştü”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/cezaevinden-cikan-kadinlar-anlatti-cezaevinde-hamile-ya-da-cocuklu-olmak-rehinelige-donustu-h127396.html

42- “Hasta tutuklunun durumu ağırlaşıyor”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/hasta-tutuklunun-durumu-agirlasiyor-h126915.html

43- “Silivri Cezaevi’nde işkence:Oğlum ziyarete gözü mor, kolunda yara izleriyle ve ayakkabısız getirildi”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/silivri-cezaevinde-iskenceoglum-ziyarete-gozu-mor-kolunda-yara-izleriyle-ve-ayakkabisiz-getirildi-h126865.html

44- “Cezaevinde kadınlara saldırı: Apar topar hastaneye kaldırdılar”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/cezaevinde-kadinlara-saldiri-apar-topar-hastaneye-kaldirdilar-h126762.html

45- “Amerikalı gazeteciden Enes Kanter’e anlamlı destek”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/amerikali-gazeteciden-enes-kantere-anlamli-destek-h127608.html

46- “Amerikalı gazeteci: Diktatörünüz sahte bir darbe sahneledi ve kullandı”
http://aktifhaber.com/dunya/amerikali-gazeteci-diktatorunuz-sahte-bir-darbe-sahneledi-ve-kullandi-h127628.html

47- “Cumartesi Anneleri: Gerçek bir yargı, gerçek bir adalet istiyoruz”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/cumartesi-anneleri-gercek-bir-yargi-gercek-bir-adalet-istiyoruz-h127597.html

48- “’Türk gazetecilerin meslektaşlarının hapsedilmesini meşru görmesi sapkınlık’”
http://aktifhaber.com/medya/turk-gazetecilerin-meslektaslarinin-hapsedilmesini-mesru-gormesi-sapkinlik-h127560.html

49- “Türkiye Gazeteciler Sendikası Genel Sekreteri: Medyaya korku iklimi hâkim!”
http://aktifhaber.com/medya/turkiye-gazeteciler-sendikasi-genel-sekreteri-medyaya-korku-iklimi-hakim-h127250.html

50- “112 gazeteciye 547 yıl hapis cezası, 3 bin 230 gazeteciye işsizlik…”
http://aktifhaber.com/medya/112-gazeteciye-547-yil-hapis-cezasi-3-bin-230-gazeteciye-issizlik-h126956.html

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AST Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly December 16

Download as pdf: AST_Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly_December 10

Turkey’s Human Rights Violations | 12/10/2018-12/16/2018

1-” Michael Flynn’s business associates charged with illegally lobbying for Turkey”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/legal-issues/michael-flynns-business-partner-charged-with-illegally-lobbying-for-turkey/2018/12/17/46fb3762-020a-11e9-9122-82e98f91ee6f_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.3a3c9aa4499c

2-“US Denies Trump Thinking About Extraditing Gulen to Turkey”
https://www.voanews.com/a/us-denies-trump-thinking-about-extraditing-gulen-to-turkey-/4705146.html

3-“Turkey: Erdogan adviser denies journalist crackdown”
https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-europe-46568324/turkey-erdogan-adviser-denies-journalist-crackdown

4-“Turkey Not Only Jailing Writers, but Readers Too”
https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/turkey/.premium-turkey-not-only-jailing-writers-but-readers-too-1.6748138

5-” Why I’m Sick of Turkey”
https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/11/22/thanksgiving-sick-of-turkey-country-222644

6-” Watch: Thousands protest in Turkey for better living conditions”
https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/12/16/583128/Diyarbakir-Turkey-protest-living-condition

7-” Watch: Michael Flynn’s ex-partner, Bijan Rafiekian, charged with lobbying for Turkey”
https://globalnews.ca/video/4772260/michael-flynns-ex-partner-bijan-rafiekian-charged-with-lobbying-for-turkey

8-” The Secret Jewish Plot Against Turkey”
https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/.premium-the-secret-jewish-plot-against-turkey-1.6742265

9-“Kidnapped, Escaped, and Survived to Tell the Tale: How Erdogan’s Regime Tried to Make Us Disappear”
https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/turkey/.premium.MAGAZINE-how-erdogan-s-loyalists-try-to-make-us-disappear-1.6729331

10-“Turkey identifies over 92,000 ByLock users: Minister”
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/turkey-identifies-over-92-000-bylock-users-minister-139640

11-“Facing Attack, George Soros’s Foundation Will Shut Down in Turkey”
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/26/world/europe/george-soros-open-society-turkey-closes.html

12-“Turkey’s president finds a new enemy: the famous Hungarian Jew”
https://www.economist.com/europe/2018/12/15/turkeys-president-finds-a-new-enemy-the-famous-hungarian-jew

13-“People who emulate yellow vest protests in Turkey will pay heavy price: MHP leader”
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/people-who-emulate-yellow-vest-protests-in-turkey-will-pay-heavy-price-mhp-leader-139660

14-“Journalists face 15-year prison terms in Turkey”
https://thehill.com/policy/international/420640-journalists-face-15-year-prison-terms-in-turkey

15-“There Are No Checks and Balances in Turkey, There’s Only Erdogan, Israeli Expert Explains”
https://www.haaretz.com/middle-east-news/turkey/.premium.MAGAZINE-there-are-no-checks-and-balances-in-turkey-there-s-only-erdogan-1.6721747

16-“The cost of seeking the truth: Why this Turkish journalist had to flee to Canada”
https://globalnews.ca/news/4769411/turkish-journalist-canada/

17-“Turkey’s Erdoğan accuses news anchor of inciting protests”
https://ahvalnews.com/turkish-journalism/turkeys-erdogan-accuses-news-anchor-inciting-protests

18-“The Turkey-Venezuela mutual admiration society”
https://www.politico.eu/article/the-turkey-venezuela-mutual-admiration-society-turkish-president-recep-tayyip-erdogan-nicolas-maduro/

19-“Turkey must free Selahattin Demirtas, European rights court says”
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-46274330

20-“Turkey arrests spark fears of widening crackdown on Erdogan’s political foes”
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/turkey-arrests-academics-activists-erdogan-crackdown-protest-gezi-park-human-rights-a8647836.html

21-“New lows for human rights in Turkey”
https://thearabweekly.com/new-lows-human-rights-turkey

22-“I’m a journalist in a Turkish jail. Why is Erdogan afraid of people like me?”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/im-a-journalist-in-a-turkish-jail-why-is-erdogan-afraid-of-people-like-me/2018/11/29/e48c9720-f38a-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.7d5ceb73ed51

23-“Will Turkey’s horrible human rights record extend to 2019?
https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2018/12/turkey-dismal-democracy-record-in-2018.html

24-“Enes Kanter slams ‘scared little rats’ as NBA leaves Erdogan critic off list of best Turkish players”
https://www.scmp.com/sport/other-sport/article/2176292/enes-kanter-slams-scared-little-rats-nba-leaves-erdogan-critic

25-“EU, Turkey face off over jailed Kurdish politician”
https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2018/11/eu-turkey-face-off-demirtas-erdogan.html

26-“Inside Erdogan’s torture chambers”
https://euobserver.com/foreign/143575

27-“Turkey Revives Ghosts of Gezi Protests as Elections Loom”
https://www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2018-12-17/turkey-revives-ghosts-of-gezi-protests-as-elections-loom

28-“Erdoğan Regime Behind Forced Disappearances – Investigation”
https://ahvalnews.com/coup-attempt/erdogan-regime-behind-forced-disappearances-investigation

29-“Can Dundar: Erdogan’s laughable charade as champion of the press”
https://www.greensboro.com/opinion/columns/can-dundar-erdogan-s-laughable-charade-as-champion-of-the/article_85d55484-37f4-5671-ab44-6ca2caa0cb53.html

30-“UK court rejects Turkish extradition request for media boss”
https://www.theguardian.com/law/2018/nov/28/uk-court-rejects-turkish-extradition-request-for-media-boss

31-“Prosecutors Accuse Turkey of Covert Campaign to Pressure U.S. to Hand Over Cleric”
https://www.wsj.com/articles/two-business-partners-of-former-trump-adviser-mike-flynn-indicted-11545060554

32-“Instead of human rights, life or death rights”
https://ahvalnews.com/human-rights/instead-human-rights-life-or-death-rights

33-“Ankara pledges EU reforms amid growing human rights concerns -VoA”
https://ahvalnews.com/eu/ankara-pledges-eu-reforms-amid-growing-human-rights-concerns-voa

34-“Nobody can lecture Turkey on human rights, Erdogan says”
http://infosurhoy.com/cocoon/saii/xhtml/en_GB/news/nobody-can-lecture-turkey-on-human-rights-erdogan-says/

35-“SC hands over management of Pak-Turk schools to Turkiye MAARIF foundation”
https://tribune.com.pk/story/1865982/1-sc-hands-management-pak-turk-schools-turkiye-maarif-foundation/

Türkiye tarafından işlenenen İnsan Hakları İhlalleri | 12/10/2018-12/16/2018

1-“Cumhurbaşkanı Erdoğan: Kimseyi sokağa çıkartamayacaksınız”
http://www.milliyet.com.tr/son-dakika-cumhurbaskani-siyaset-2796147/

2-“CHP’den Erdoğan’a yanıt: Sokaktan diktatörler korkar”
https://www.bbc.com/turkce/haberler-turkiye-46584705

3-“Reuters’a konuşan Beyaz Saray yetkilisi: Trump Erdoğan’a Gülen’i iade edeceğini söylemedi”
https://www.bbc.com/turkce/haberler-dunya-46600766

4-“Cumhurbaşkanına hakaret davalarında rekor artış”
https://www.dw.com/tr/cumhurba%C5%9Fkan%C4%B1na-hakaret-davalar%C4%B1nda-rekor-art%C4%B1%C5%9F/a-46622702

5-“Erdoğan: AİHM’nin kararları bizi bağlamaz”
https://www.dw.com/tr/erdo%C4%9Fan-aihmnin-kararlar%C4%B1-bizi-ba%C4%9Flamaz/a-46374963

6-“İnsan hakları örgütleri: Sistematik ve yaygın hak ihlalleri var”
https://tr.sputniknews.com/columnists/201812101036558019-insan-haklari-orgutleri-sistematil-yaygin-hak-ihlalleri/

7-“İnsan Hakları Haftası’nda AKP’nin hak ihlalleri raporu”
https://www.evrensel.net/haber/367955/insan-haklari-haftasinda-akpnin-hak-ihlalleri-raporu

8-“İnsan Hakları Haftasında Türkiye’nin İnsan Hakları Karnesi Nasıl?”
https://www.amerikaninsesi.com/a/insan-haklari-haftasinda-turkiyenin-insan-haklari-karnesi-nasil/4694728.html

9-“Sistematik ihlaller arttı”
http://www.yeniasya.com.tr/gundem/sistematik-ihlaller-artti_480757

10-“Cumhurbaşkanı başdanışmanı BBC’ye konuşurken zor anlar yaşadı”
http://halktv.com.tr/cumhurbaskani-basdanismani-bbcye-konusurken-zor-anlar-yasadi-351931

11-“ABD’den Gülen açıklaması: ‘Bir bakarız’ dedik”
https://www.gazeteduvar.com.tr/dunya/2018/12/18/abdden-gulen-aciklamasi-bir-bakariz-dedik/

12-“CHP insan hakları raporunu açıkladı”
http://www.hurriyet.com.tr/yerel-haberler/ankara/chp-insan-haklari-raporunu-acikladi-41046763

13-“Cezaevlerinde hak ihlalleri ciddi boyuta ulaştı”
https://www.evrensel.net/haber/368280/cezaevlerinde-hak-ihlalleri-ciddi-boyuta-ulasti

14-“Şanlıurfa’daki cezaevlerinde hak ihlalleri yaşanıyor iddiası”
http://www.hurriyet.com.tr/yerel-haberler/sanliurfa/sanliurfadaki-cezaevlerinde-hak-ihlalleri-yasa-41034436

15-“‘Elazığ Cezaevi’nde işkence ve cinsel saldırı var’”
https://www.evrensel.net/haber/338232/elazig-cezaevinde-iskence-ve-cinsel-saldiri-var

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