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Take Action: Enforced disappearances in Turkey – The Case of Hüseyin Galip Küçüközyiğit

Following the coup attempt of July 15, 2016, the Turkish government declared a state of emergency paving the way for a crackdown on political opponents which has ultimately led to gross violations of civil rights and liberties of Turkish citizens.

The Turkish government has revoked passports and aggressively petitioned for the arrest and deportation of dissenters overseas including individuals under UN protection. Abductions, forced disappearances, and renditions of dissenters are among the long list of atrocious crimes committed by the Turkish government. The Turkish state has even conducted cross-border operations by brazenly abducting its citizens from other countries. This is not only an offense against the national sovereignty of countries where these covert operations are conducted but also an egregious insult to international human rights laws. There is also ample evidence to suggest that once dissenters are abducted, they undergo extensive torture and suffer physical and emotional trauma at the hands of their unidentified abductors. They are not informed of the charges brought against them as they are apprehended and are deprived of their due process rights. Some of these abducted individuals face trial after be- ing subjected to months of torture if they are lucky enough to survive the horrifying ordeal. The Turkish government has rarely repudiated claims of such horrific acts and illegalities committed against dissenters. On the contrary, these inhumane practices are lauded amongst national intelligence agencies and government officials. Stories of dissenters being viciously abducted in front of their families are boasted of by sycophant media out-lets who cheer for and commend the brutal acts of the government.

On December 29, 2020 a new allegation of enforced disappearance in Turkey about Hüseyin Galip Küçüközyiğit, a former civil servant dismissed from his job by an emergency decree, was reported. His daughter, Nursena Küçüközyiğit, has been trying to file a criminal complaint saying that her father was abducted, however, authorities in the northwestern city of Kocaeli, notably the public prosecutor’s office and the police department, refused to receive the complaint.

Last Contact With The Abductee

Küçüközyiğit last spoke with his daughter Nursena on the phone on December 29 at around 3:30 p.m. His coworkers were the last people to have seen him. About 4 p.m. he left his office to visit a friend in Ankara’s Gölbaşı district, by a Mazda 323 with license plate 34 FNF 28. His cell phone stopped receiving signals at 4:23 pm.

Nursena Küçüközyiğit says her father was unemployed for a long time after being expelled from public service and was held in detention for six months for his alleged links with Gülen Movement. After he was released, he set up a business to offer legal advice to other purged public sector workers, which, Nursena believes might have been the reason her father to be abducted.

Similarities with Other Abduction Incidents

Kucukozyigit was a civil servant like many other victims of the recent abduction cases. Almost all abductions occurred at public places while the abductee was about to leave from an acquainted location. After months of their disappearances, victims resurfaced under police detention and were arrested immediately. Also almost in all cases, police officers and public prosecutors have been hesitant to open a case in spite of the clear and concrete evidence of a crime.

Growing Number of Cases of Abductions with Black Transporters

In many of the disappearances, a black transport vehicle is used, according to the eyewitnesses and CCTV footages. A group of masked men, believed to be the members of the Turkish intelligence agency, are grabbing the victims and pulling them into a black transporter van and disappear swiftly.

Almost all of the victims of these enforced disappearances resurfaced months after they went missing in bruises and traumatized. Some have spoken out in court, recounting the systematic and severe torture they were subjected to during their secret interrogation by the National Intelligence Organization (MİT), The victims also have reported that they were kept until their wounds got healed to be handed over to the police.

According to the testimonies of former MİT directors Erhan Pekçetin and Aydın Günel, who was captured by Syrian Kurdish militants in 2017 while they were in a covert operation in northern Syria, all abducted people that have affiliations with the Hizmet movement were tortured and interrogated in a building in the capital city of Turkey, Ankara(1)

Nursena thinks her father is yet another victim of the enforced disappearances and she is worried that he might be subject to torture. She says has reached CCTV footages displaying that Galip Kucukozyigit was followed by three suspicious men on the day he disappeared but she was not able to convince a prosecutor to open an investigation.

According to Kucukozyigit’s daughter Nursena, Turkish police are not willing to search for evidence against her father’s kidnapping. The only answer she could get from the police is: “We are unable to provide any information.” Families of other victims were also faced with the same attitude by the police, who were reluctant to investigate and collect evidence. The United Nations Working Group on Enforced and Involuntary Disappearances in its reports emphasized that the Turkish authorities were not pursuing the necessary investigative tracks. Detailed information about and a full list of enforced disappearances of Turkish nationals can be found in AST’s report, Erdogan’s Long Arms: Abductions In Turkey And Abroad2.

Forced disappearances and abductions are an assault on human rights as established by the Convention on the Forced Disappearance of Persons. According to Advocates for Silenced Turkey (AST)’s report3, there have been 135 abductions and forced disappearances to date; this report consists of an alarming number of ac- counts of abductions and torture provided by abductees. AST calls on international human rights organizations to urge Turkish authorities to abide by domestic and international laws of human rights and cease their illegal and inhumane practices of abductions, forced disappearance, and renditions immediately.

Hafza Y. GIRDAP
Executive Director and Spokespersondirectorhg@silencedturkey.org

1 “MIT Officials Confess Turkey’s Relations with ISIS and Al Nusra.” ANF News, 23 Jan.2018, anfenglish.com/news/mit-officials-confess-turkey-s-relations-with-isis- and-al-nusra-24382.

2 https://silencedturkey.org/erdogans-long-arms-abductions-in-turkey-and-abroad

3 https://silencedturkey.org/erdogans-long-arms-abductions-in-turkey-and-abroad

Relevant Human Rights Institutions
The Honorable Dunja MijatovicOffice of the Commissioner for Human Rights Council of Europe
Avenue de I’Europe F-67075
Strasbourg Cedex, FrancePhone: +33 (0)3 88 41 34 21
Fax: +33 (0)3 90 21 50 53
Email: commissioner@coe.int
United National Human Rights Committee

Petitions Team
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights United Nations Office at Geneva
1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

Fax: + 41 22 917 9022 (particularly for urgent matters)
E-mail: petitions@ohchr.org
Committee Against Torture

Petitions and Inquiries Section
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights United Nations Office at Geneva
1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

E-mail:
petitions@ohchr.org
TB-petitions@ohchr.org
cat@ohchr.org
registry@ohchr.org

United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances

OHCHR-UNOG CH
1211 Geneva 10 Switzerland

Phone: (41-22) 917 90 00
Fax: (+41-22) 917 90 06
E-mail: wgeid@ohchr.org
Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission House Committee on Foreign Affairs 5100 O’Neill House Office Building 200 C Street SW
Washington, D.C. 20515

Phone: +1 (202) 225-3599
Fax: +1 (202) 226-6584
Email: TLHRC@mail.house.gov
US Helsinki Commission

234 Ford House Office Building 3rd and D Streets SW
Washington, DC 20515

Email: info@csce.gov
The Honorable Abdülhamit Gül

Minister of Justice
06659 Kizilay
Ankara, Republic of Turkey

Email: info@adalet.gov.tr

 

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LA FEMME QUI A SURVÉCU À LA PURGE TURQUE

Un roman graphique sur les femmes qui ont survécu après le long voyage sous le régime dictatorial de la Turquie.

Reconnaissance : Après la prétendue tentative de coup d’État du 15 juillet 2016, des milliers de personnes ont perdu leur emploi et ont fait l’objet de poursuites et de procédures au motif qu’elles étaient des partisans du mouvement Hizmet. Des centaines de personnes qui n’ont aucun espoir de survivre dans cette atmosphère débilitante en Turquie tentent de quitter le pays illégalement en risquant de traverser la frontière et de faire face à la mort pour vivre librement. Il y a eu des gens qui ont eu beaucoup de mal dans ce voyage difficile et ardu.

Advocates of Silenced Turkey (AST) est une organisation non gouvernementale qui mène ses activités sur base volontaire. Ils se sont donné pour mission de faire entendre la voix des personnes privées de leurs droits jusqu’à ce que les droits de l’homme universels et la gouvernance démocratique aient été établis et soient considérés comme les principales priorités de la République de Turquie.

Ce roman graphique a été créé par un lycéen en s’inspirant d’histoires réelles sur le projet APH.

PDF LINK

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THE WOMEN WHO SURVIVED THE TURKEY PURGE

A Graphic Novel about the women who survived after the long journey in Turkey’s dictatorial regime.

After the alleged coup attempt of July 15, 2016, thousands of people lost their jobs and were subjected to court trials and proceedings on the grounds that they were Hizmet Movement followers. Hundreds of people, who do not have a hope to survive in this grueling atmosphere in Turkey, are striving to leave the country illegally by venturing into the risk of crossing the border and facing death in order to live freely. There were people who drowned in this difficult and harsh journey.

Advocates of Silenced Turkey (AST), as a non-governmental organization that runs its activities on a voluntary basis, has made it a mission to champion the rights of Silenced Turkey until universal human rights and democratic governance are established and sustained as the utmost priorities of the Republic of Turkey.

This graphic novel was created by a high school student with inspiration from real stories on the APH project.

Graphic Novel PDF

Turkish Version PDF Link

 

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THE ILLUSTRATIONS OF A TEACHER IN PRISON

Booklet PDF

WHO AM I?
I was born in 1983, in the city of Zonguldak, Turkey. My mother was a housewife; my father was a retired teacher. We were four siblings, and I was the only male child in the house. Due to my father’s profession, we lived in many different cities and towns and had the opportunity to experience various geographies, places, and people. Though I was never very good at my studies, ever since I was little I always had an interest in the arts, particularly drawing. I don’t remember when I first began to be interested in drawing. When I couldn’t find any paper to draw on, I would go ahead and draw my pictures on the walls of our house. Needless to say, I received a fair share of scolding from my mom on that account. During my high school years, through the encouragement of my art teacher, I enrolled in a painting (drawing) course in the city we lived in. Enrolling in this course naturally paved my way into a great university. After completing my [extended] university education, through the reference from the private school where I completed my internship, I was offered a job in a very nice district/city. (This is, in fact, the place where I hope to settle down one day once I reach my retirement, God-willing.) After working in that position for a year, I had to leave in order to fulfill my mandatory military service. Upon completing my military service, I came back and started prepping for the public employee selection exams. When I couldn’t score enough points to be appointed to a public school, I started working at another private school. Unfortunately, due to some unpleasant situations I came across, I had to leave my job there. I spent the next year preparing for the exams one more time. When I could not again score enough points the second time around, my brother-in-law encouraged me to go to Mardin, a city in southeastern Turkey, where there was a shortage of teachers at a private school there. After working at that school for two years, I met my future wife and we got married. Shortly after I heard about an opening for a teaching position in the city which I had loved dearly but had had to leave years ago. Without wasting any time, I applied for the position. I spent four wonderful years teaching in that city, four wonderful years… after which dark clouds started falling upon us.

WHAT I EXPERIENCED DURING THIS WHOLE ORDEAL

I imagine you are somewhat familiar with what comes next. First of all, our work permits were canceled. When I saw the news on television and learned that a state of emergency had been declared, I did my best to keep calm. I asked my mother-in-law to make us some tea so we could sit and enjoy ourselves and not let this bring our spirits down. My wife ended up crying that evening. I tried to reassure her and told her, “Don’t worry. Even if Allah has blocked one path, He will surely open up another.” Sure enough, after that we worked in many different places, in many different cities. There were times when we were even laughed at and mocked. But never did we ever resort to any embarrassing acts or engage in any disgraceful activities. To this day, I can proudly say that we can hold our heads high and walk with dignity. In any case, the government had already started arbitrarily firing people from their jobs, and some opportunist business owners used that opening to hire these unfortunate victims, paying them less than half the amount of what the job should have paid, not to mention the fact that they were denied any benefits or insurance. I’m talking about people who were just like us. I heard of a teacher that had begun working at a gas station. Some friends of the business owner –who were pro-government–were constantly pressuring him, saying, “What?!! How come he is still working for you? Just fire him!” His answer to their objections was quite meaningful; he had replied, “Find me a guy who is as trustworthy and honest as this one and I will fire this one right away.” As far as I know, that person is still working at that gas station… Before having been taken to prison, I had started working at a publishing house. Since I hadn’t been particularly happy with their work policy, I had left that job. And now after my time in prison, I am working at another publishing house. Thanks and praise be to my dear God, I am among the ones who actually has a job to go to. In a country where more than half of the young population is out looking for work, this is truly a blessing. As I head out to work each morning, I catch myself thinking back to the days I spent locked behind bars. Judging by the surprised looks of the people walking past me on the sidewalk, I’m guessing I probably have a huge smile on my face as my thoughts wander back. I used to be a teacher before all this happened. And not just any teacher… I was a teacher who for nine whole years had gone to every class, every day with the same excitement and enthusiasm as the last!.. Thus, I will use a teacher example to explain the next part of my story. You know when you ask a parent about a teacher– if they happen to know the teacher you are asking about–the first thought to cross their mind will probably be, ”Let’s see, was there anything negative about this teacher?” (Of course, they’ll probably be keeping this thought to themselves.) If they can’t think of anything bad, then they’ll say the teacher was ok and kind of brush that off as an answer. The reason? If you ask me, it’s just how people naturally react, that’s all. The first thought to enter our minds about a person is the bad memories they left us with (if any). When you think back about a previous teacher, the things you remember are whether you experienced anything negative with that teacher or not. Now, coming back to my own story, when people ask me how it was on the “inside,” first of all, a great big smile spreads across my face. Then I remember the jokes, the pranks, the fooling around and the sweet mischief, the chitchats around a pot of tea, our excitement for the “snack bar” day, and our deep conversations that extended well into the night. In all honesty, the bad memories are the ones that I remember the last. Now you ask me, is this normal? I should probably start off with telling you that I, myself, am not your typical, normal guy. I can say that I had already somewhat driven myself out of my mind years ago with all the doodling and drawing and the shaping clay into statues and sculptures and crushing them into tiny bits after taking them from the mold, and whatnot… Or maybe it was because I had no bad memories from the “inside.” The people I was in prison with were all educated people, well-mannered and people of good character. The couple of months I spent with them was not wasted with problems like having to learn to adapt to a new environment or wait until we “clicked” with the others. It felt as though I was staying with childhood buddies that I had known my whole life, arm in arm, hand in hand, lighthearted fun and ruckus all around. There was hardship, though, I cannot deny that. And I try to portray that in my drawings. In fact, you’ll see later on that I had a special wish regarding this matter, during the time I was in prison (which may surprise you a bit). The coup attempt that took place in the country was a kind of revolution that had completely different effects on the people going about their lives outside and on those of us who were locked “inside.” We had now become “the other.” People who knew us, who knew who and what we were, would not even walk on the same side of the street with us anymore, they would change their paths once they saw us coming. I didn’t let this become a concern of mine. My own father was among the first to be taken into custody during the initial operations carried out in the city of Konya. I cannot forget the day he was taken away. They just showed up at our house early one morning and took him away before we even had a chance to understand what was going on. God bless them, at least they were considerate about it; they did not shout about or throw insults like the stories we had heard of others. I spent some time looking for work here and there. Naturally, almost every door I went to closed upon me. In fact, during one of my interviews, the man who would be hiring me openly said it to my face: ”Brother, I’ll be honest with you, you are just the guy I am looking for, but if I go ahead and hire you I’ll be getting myself into trouble.” We had to go back to the town where I last worked so we could gather up our belongings and leave, and while we were there, one of our neighbors decided to report us to the police. They came straight away, and I spent that evening in custody. I cannot erase the image I have in my mind of my mother with her teary eyes. First my father, and now me… The next day I was released under judicial control. A couple of days later we changed our official address and settled down in our second hometown. Meanwhile, both my father-in-law and brother in-law were also arrested. They needed someone to look after their business and take care of things on their farm. And so, even though I knew nothing about working the soil, I found myself atop a tractor harvesting carrots on thousands of acres of land just so I could help them out somehow. Though it was difficult at first, I found that in time I grew to like it. After my brother-in-law was released and he could take over and the workload eased up a bit, I could look for jobs in my own field of work. Upon returning to Konya, after doing some odd jobs here and there, I finally started working at a printing center. Meanwhile, my father was transferred to the Alanya prison. Every once in a while I would go and visit during open visitation, but it was my mother who mostly went to the visits because of the distance and expenses involved. Someone I used to work for, and who I loved and respected dearly, vouched for me and I started working at a publishing house after the Ramadan Eid festival were over. Yes, I was working now, but only a month into it and it was time for the court hearings. The hearings took three days. I went in all three days, and I sat and listened. On the second day, before the court adjourned for the day’s lunch break, the judge turned to me and said, “Yes, let’s listen to what you have to say also.” He had the SEGBIS (Sound and Video Information System) closed down. I spoke about my work history. There was no record regarding a report filed in my name, or my name being mentioned anywhere specific, etc… Everything was running smoothly, then the judge spoke again, “Look, our own children were educated in these institutions as well,” and the prosecutor’s head bobbed slowly up and down as if affirming what the judge had just said. Then he asked me the question, “Do you think they were the ones to carry out this coup?” I knew this was a trick question, but still I fell into their trap. Rather, I should say, there were some possible answers I could have given, but I just couldn’t. (It was like Allah did not allow me to say it, I’m guessing that there is some kind of divine wisdom behind my being taken in.) My answer was (as recorded in the official report), “I do not believe that the individuals I worked with in these institutions were members of a [terrorist] organization. In fact, I do not believe they had any relations with either the December 17/25 operations or the coup attempt which took place on July 15, 2016. I am among those individuals who believe that the members of this [social] structure have not committed the act of staging a coup. I see Fethullah Gulen as a leader with a specific religious vision/perspective. I do not believe that he has engaged in any activities which aim to disintegrate any government or state. I have never been a witness to any testimonies delivered by himself to that effect. I believe that the events which took place on July 15, 2016 were forged and were false actions. I am among those who believe that such a coup was merely a stage act.” The court room was dead silent– no sound, no movement at all. The judge spoke to me, “You do understand that this is the high criminal court, you may very well be arrested.” I do not remember anything I said from that point onward. For the first time in my life, my blood sugar levels plummeted, and I felt a dizziness in my head. I held on to the railing in front of me to keep my balance. As I was about to collapse onto the floor, I lowered myself down and just sat on the floor. I asked for some water. The court clerk looked at me, eyes wide open as if to say, “What on earth did you just do!” The judge ordered the clerk to take a record of what I had said, the most significant parts at least, and said to me,”You will come back for the hearings this afternoon, and the ones tomorrow. If you fail to come on your own, I will see to it that the police make sure you come here.” “I understand your honor,” I replied. My mind was telling me right then and there that I would be arrested for sure. When I made it home at the end of the day, I told my wife all that had happened throughout the day. The next day’s hearing was a very short one. The interim decision was announced right away. I was under arrest. My first encounter was with the handcuffs. What we saw only in movies and on television had become the reality of our own lives now. As I was being taken to the hospital for the routine check-up, with permission from the police I called up my wife to inform her of what was going on. She couldn’t say anything except shed tears on the other end of the line. I don’t know whether it was from the shock of it all or just me trying to keep my calm, but there were no tears or any sense of sorrow on my end. I was finally taken to the prison. After taking my information down, the guardians casually conversed on which ward to send me to, displaying such levity as if they were playing the lottery or some other game. When I heard B11, I was all ears since my father had also been kept in that same ward. I entered the ward and looked around hoping to see a familiar face when right before me stood the general director of the institution that I had been working for. “What are you doing here?” he asked me. I told him the whole story. I admit, I did cry a little bit then. “Are you hungry, let’s fix you something to eat,” they offered right away. As I ate, all my fellow “inmates” came over to say sorry for what had happened, asked my name and started up conversations to welcome me in. I stayed in that ward for about two weeks. Even the district governor from our hometown was there. From professors in the university to former police officers, people were there from all walks of life. I don’t remember the exact date, but on one of the weekends we even had a “çiğ köfte” (traditional dish made with crushed wheat, tomato paste, herbs and spices, usually eaten as comfort food) party. We bought the supplies from the snack bar. One of our friends in the ward “kneaded” the delicacy. We prepared the “ayran” (traditional yogurt drink) and spread out our blankets in the courtyard. We ate and had a good time, we even enjoyed our tea afterwards. It was a truly extraordinary day spent in an extraordinary location. Towards the end, some friends grew so enthusiastic that they even started singing marches from Ottoman times (the Plevne march). I guess the prison guards were listening to us from the top floor because the guards immediately rushed over and shut the doors. The next day we received a written notice. Because of the march sung the day before, an investigation file was being opened on our ward. It was obvious that things were going to turn sour. A few days later the whole ward was dispersed, and everyone was sent somewhere else. We gathered in the courtyard and said our goodbyes. I cried a lot, it was a heartbreaking separation. I was sent to ward C7 with two other retired police officers. I stayed there for six weeks. It was about a quarter the size of the previous ward- -a small, tiny ward– but it was all the more sincere and warm. Like all the other wards, it was filled with educated gentlemen. From the morning until the afternoon, prayers books were read and conversations circled around the material that was read. When the afternoon prayer time rolled around, those of us who felt young gathered up and played some volleyball in the courtyard. I spent the Eid al-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice) in that ward. It was an Eid that I will never forget and will always cherish. Among my fellow inmates was a former student’s parent and a doctor who had previously stayed in the same ward with my father. A project being drawn up by the Ministry of Justice was revealed. They were planning to mix inmates like us together with criminals of petty offenses. They had chosen Konya to be the pilot prison to try out this new plan, but their plan did not operate like they had intended. So, one Tuesday morning, I was taken back to my old ward once again. This time around, the number of inmates had increased, the faces had changed, even the atmosphere felt a bit different. It didn’t feel as comfortable as it used to be. Because it was more crowded now, everything from sleeping arrangements to the long bathroom lines, felt like a big issue now. Thank God, though, despite everything, days were going by quickly, with no fights or any uproars. A couple weeks later, the Konya “Çatı” file (in which many individuals were being tried for the same crime) hearings started. Some of the inmates in our ward were also being taken to the court as part of these hearings. One day, as we were waiting for our friends to come back from the hearings, someone had slid open the window opening on the ward door, asking for me. I had been outside in the courtyard while this was happening, and I rushed to the door when they said my father was calling for me. I was in shock. I couldn’t believe my eyes. It had been months since I had last seen my father, and now he was standing right across from me. I held his hand so tightly, and we talked for a bit. He looked around at my ward and greeted some of the familiar faces he saw, and then all of a sudden they shut the window. It turns out they had secretly opened the window when waiting in the corridor. His friends had kept watch and covered for him. (I tried to illustrate this in the drawing No.24) This was bound to happen when his petition to have us stay in the same ward was turned down. When his petitions were left unanswered, he asked to meet in person with the director, and at last they were able to come to an agreement. One Friday, shortly after the noontime prayers (by the way, because our activities were always centered around the prayer times, when speaking about the time, the vocabulary naturally turned to expressions such as “after this prayer,” “before that prayer,” etc..) as I was reading from the Qur’an, the doors opened. There, standing at the door was my father, holding his belongings. I yelled out, “Father!” and reached towards him as he stepped inside. I learned later that when I cried out like that, one of my fellow inmates started crying because he hadn’t seen his own father for months. It was heartbreaking to hear. Yet, happily for us, we had been united, father and son in the same ward. The last month passed by very quickly. Meanwhile, on the one hand, I was drawing my sketches of what life was like behind bars. On the other hand, I was getting ready for my court hearing. There was an inmate friend who had been a court clerk. I would consult with him, and we would exchange ideas on how I should go about my defense. All the while, my inmate friends would bring over pictures of their spouses, children, mothers and fathers, asking me to transform the pictures into a drawing for them. I did not want to break any of their hearts, so I would take them and work on them as well. On one of those days, I remember I had worked on five different pictures, one after the other, no break. Why they all waited until my last week there beats me! On Saturday, my group was on night duty; on Sunday, I was part of the cleaning crew. I was so beat that the “big brother” of the ward (when I say “big brother” don’t imagine the kind you see in the movies who racketeers money from the other inmates; he was truly a guy who looked out for us and took care of our needs.) felt sorry for me and backed me up saying, ”Why are you guys working this poor kid so much, ease up on him. He’s being released tomorrow!” Monday afternoon I appeared at the court hearing and returned back to the ward towards the evening, a little after the nightly roll-call. Everyone’s eyes were wide open, staring at me with questioning eyes. “RELEASE!” I yelled out and an excited uproar broke out. We celebrated with whistles and applause and congratulations all around. I told everyone how it all went down. After the nightly prayer, I said my goodbyes and left for home. I must have been the only inmate who found it so hard to leave their prison ward, because it also meant I was being separated from my father–again. As I stepped out, I turned and said, “See you Wednesday.” Some of them looked at me with a puzzled expression, but then it hit them that it was open visitation on Wednesday! I would be coming to see my father, as a visitor this time!

WHY I DREW THESE PICTURES

The year I started my university education, I considered dropping out, and on not just one, but three separate occasions. In fact, on my third attempt, I even made it as far as the door of the Student Affairs office (and turned back around, of course). It was an environment that I just couldn’t get used to. I felt like I was in a completely different world. People were so relaxed, so occupied with themselves, not stopping to look around at other people and just going about their own (selfish) lives. As for the professors, they were on a whole different planet, so to speak. I felt like I was a foreign student from a faraway land. As I was about to open the door of the Student Affairs office, a thought hit me, just like that, “If I came all the way here, somehow, some way, then there must be a reason for it.” And at that moment, I decided against leaving. If I had dropped out of school, I would never have become a teacher; if I hadn’t become a teacher, my work permit would never have been canceled for such an arbitrary reason, I would never have had a criminal case opened in my name, I would never have been locked up behind bars, I would never have had the opportunity to meet so many amazing people in prison, never have had the memories which I portray in my drawings to share with you… The first thought that came to my mind after I was put in prison was, “Well, I finally get to have a vacation.” One of my inmate friends who was an assistant professor in the field of physics (I keep referring back to the people I met in prison. I can’t help it, because they are all such special and precious individuals whom I cherish. I had always heard about how the friendships formed in the military and in prison were unforgettable, now I know by experience.) said to me, “Brother, I never had a chance to get a tattoo when I was outside, would you draw a dragon tattoo on my shoulder?” I couldn’t say no to such a wish, so I drew one, using a pen. A few days later, a group of friends chatting in the courtyard caught my attention, and I was moved to make a drawing of them (note picture No.18). In fact, one of my friends in the prison wanted to keep the drawing as a memory, so I gifted it to him. A colleague of mine, who had also been my director and who had first welcomed me into the ward, saw the work I did and said to me, “If you ask me, you should draw all that you can to portray what it is like in here, show them in your drawings. A day will come when justice will be sought in the courts. Just as there was a way into all of this, there will be a way out.. When that day comes, everyone should be able to see what we went through.” Upon his advice, I started observing all the activities going on about me more intently, such as the roll-call in the ward, the bathroom line, the “snack bar” day, open visitations, what the ward looked like on a regular day, etc..and I stored everything in my memory. I even felt the need to apologize to my wife one evening. “What are you apologizing for?” she asked me. “I didn’t pay much attention to you during visitation,” I replied. “I was busy observing all that was going on around us so I could store them in my memory and get it down in my drawings.” I drew all that I could find time for while I was still “inside” and the rest of the drawings, I completed after my release. Whenever some friends ask me whether there’s anything new, I give a vague answer and say, “I’m working on it…” Months ago, when I did share a couple of my drawings, they somehow got passed back and forth among friends wanting to share with their close ones, and all of a sudden I had become an anonymous artist on social media. Whenever I started working on anything new, my inmate friends would joke around, saying, “Don’t forget to draw me too bro!” and would always support me. One of my friends in ward C7 said to me, “Brother, whatever you see here, try and carry it all as best you can onto your drawings. We try and do the best we can to pour out our hearts, to write down our memories, our poems, our homesickness and our experiences as best we can, but what you can express through your drawings can only be expressed through pages and pages of writing and still not be as effective.” (The person saying this to me was a professor who had authored the only book written in his own specific field of study.) When I had returned to my previous ward and got to meet new people and form new friendships, I had the opportunity to get to know them and listen to their stories as well. When I told them about my interest in drawing, the first thing they would ask me would be, “Brother, have you drawn pictures about our life here?” and I would rush and bring my drawings to show them. They would admire the drawings and grow emotional. One of them even said, “I keep telling my wife about how we even wash dishes and do laundry and clean and mop, but she blows me off telling me not to exaggerate. If I showed her this, she certainly wouldn’t be so cynical anymore.” The smile that would appear on the faces of those looking at the drawings, it was truly something invaluable, priceless; it meant more to me than the wealth of the worlds. A brother who looked at the pictures said, “Brother, you truly have found your calling here.” I was walking on clouds that day. I was so filled with joy– it felt like I was literally flying. I went to bed late that night. I stayed up, working on my drawings. I thought to myself, “I wish I could change wards every week and be able to draw the uniqueness being experienced in each one of them.” With these thoughts running through my head, I have tried to take notes of all the moments and memories I stored in my heart and mind. Unfortunately, there were some drawings that I could not finish to include in this book. I hope and pray that I have been able to duly portray the atmosphere we all experienced on the “inside.” I thank God that He put me in there. I got to experience unforgettable memories, and I got to know unforgettable people while I was in there. And I was blessed to experience some of the most delicious food I have ever tasted in my life, like the menemen (traditional breakfast dish made with eggs, tomatoes, and peppers) our friends had prepared for us on the semaver (traditional tea pot) during our Eid al-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice) celebratory breakfast.

If I were a swallow flapping
his winds at the setting sun,

If I ripped out the pages
of my life and started anew

If swung my prayer beads through every
inch of the concrete courtyard I walked
on, while saying a prayer for each new
day, hoping this would end one day

If I raised my hands a bit higher each day,
for you, and my family, and your children

If I begged and pleaded as
my hands touched the ceiling of
the ward, would you, o brother, give me
a handful of your freedom?

I raise my hands up
to my Lord, and I pray,

Please don’t silence this
melody before its day.

These tribulations
shall surely be no more,

As the whole world
will witness one day..

 

 

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AST Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly Dec 11

Download as pdf: AST_Turkey’s Human Rights Violations Weekly_Dec11

Turkey’s Human Rights Violations | 12/4/2017-12/11/2017

1-“768 senior public servants, families claimed asylum in Germany: report”
https://turkeypurge.com/768-senior-public-servants-families-claimed-asylum-germany-report

2-“Journalist Mehmet Baransu remains arrested following court hearing”
https://turkeypurge.com/journalist-mehmet-baransu-remains-arrested-following-court-hearing

3-“10 judges, prosecutors and lawyers detained in new post-coup probe”
https://turkeypurge.com/10-judges-prosecutors-lawyers-detained-new-post-coup-probe

4-“Prosecutor moves to end parliamentary immunity for 19 pro-Kurdish HDP lawmakers”
https://turkeypurge.com/prosecutor-moves-end-parliamentary-immunity-19-pro-kurdish-hdp-lawmakers

5-“664 people detained over Gülen links in past week: ministry”
https://turkeypurge.com/664-people-detained-gulen-links-past-week-ministry

6-“Jailed Visually Impaired Turkish Journalist Still Lack Of Lawyer To Take Assistance For His Defence Before Courts”
https://stockholmcf.org/jailed-visually-impaired-turkish-journalist-still-lack-of-lawyer-to-take-assistance-for-his-defence-before-courts/

7-“Erdoğan’s Henchman Threatens Exiled Turkish Journalists With Extrajudicial Killings”
https://stockholmcf.org/erdogans-henchman-threatens-turkish-journalists-with-extrajudicial-killings/

8-“Jailed Turkish-German Journalist Deniz Yücel Taken Out Of Solitary Confinement”
https://stockholmcf.org/jailed-turkish-german-journalist-deniz-yucel-taken-out-of-solitary-confinement/

9-“Turkish Police Torture Brother Of A Human Rights Lawyer In Southeast Anatolia”
https://stockholmcf.org/turkish-police-torture-brother-of-a-human-rights-lawyer-in-southeast-anatolia/

10-“Trial begins for peace declaration academics on Dec. 5”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/04/trial-begins-for-peace-declaration-academics-on-dec-5/

11-“İHD and TİHV: 2,278 tortured, 11 abducted in Turkey in 2017”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/09/ihd-and-tihv-2278-tortured-11-abducted-in-turkey-in-2017/

12-“Ankara governor bans anti-corruption speech by communist party member”
https://turkeypurge.com/ankara-governor-bans-anti-corruption-speech-communist-party-member

13-” Swedish Left Party Head Sjöstedt Says Turkish Police Threatened Him To Arrest”
https://stockholmcf.org/swedish-left-party-head-sjostedt-says-turkish-police-threatened-him-to-arrest/

14-“Turkish Gov’t Reluctant To Assign 1,100 Newly Graduated Medical Doctors On Basis Of Security Checks”
https://stockholmcf.org/turkish-govt-reluctant-to-assign-1100-newly-graduated-medical-doctors-on-basis-of-security-checks/

15-“İstanbul court rules for continuation of arrest of Zaman columnists”
https://turkeypurge.com/istanbul-court-rules-continuation-arrest-zaman-columnists

16-“15-year jail term sought for owner of Hosta kebab chain over coup charges”
https://turkeypurge.com/15-year-jail-term-sought-owner-hosta-kebab-chain-coup-charges

17-“Policeman Suspended By Turkish Gov’t Reportedly Dies While Working As Construction Worker”
https://stockholmcf.org/policeman-suspended-by-turkish-govt-reportedly-dies-while-working-as-construction-worker/

18-“Rights groups say 2,278 people tortured, 11 abducted in Turkey in 2017”
https://turkeypurge.com/rights-groups-say-2278-tortured-11-abducted-turkey-2017

19-“Ankara governor bans anti-corruption speech by communist party member”
https://turkeypurge.com/ankara-governor-bans-anti-corruption-speech-communist-party-member

20-” Research shows purge in Turkey ruined lives of 21,000 health care workers ”
https://turkeypurge.com/new-report-shows-turkeys-purge-ruined-lives-21000-health-care-workers

21-” Turkish police officer who saved Erdoğan on night of coup arrested over Gülen links”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/08/turkish-police-officer-who-saved-erdogan-on-night-of-coup-arrested-over-gulen-links/

22-“Press groups call on EU to be less deferential towards Turkey on rights violations”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/08/press-groups-call-on-eu-to-be-less-deferential-towards-turkey-on-rights-violations/

23-“Soldier charged TL 34 million for ‘coup damages’ in Ankara: report”
https://turkeypurge.com/soldier-charged-tl-34-million-coup-damages-report

24-“Court rules to keep pro-Kurdish opposition leader Selahattin Demirtaş behind bars”
https://turkeypurge.com/court-rules-keep-pro-kurdish-opposition-leader-selahattin-demirtas-behind-bars

25-“Report says 300 families have fled Turkey to Greece due to post-coup crackdown”
https://turkeypurge.com/300-families-fled-turkeys-post-coup-crackdown-greece-report

26-“Turkey seizes US witness Reza Zarrab’s private jet, yacht”
https://turkeypurge.com/turkey-seizes-us-witness-reza-zarrabs-private-jet-yacht

27-“Turkey detains 17 for ‘providing US with information’ for Zarrab case”
https://turkeypurge.com/turkey-detains-17-providing-us-information-zarrab-case

28-“Turkish court rules for continuation of 20 journalists on coup charges”
https://turkeypurge.com/turkish-court-rules-continuation-20-journalists-coup-charges

29-“Turkey jails solyayin.com editor-in-chief, closes down website on terror charges”
https://turkeypurge.com/solyayin-com-editor-chief-arrested-website-closed-terror-charges

30-“Turkey seizes assets of former opposition deputy over Zarrab case”
https://turkeypurge.com/turkey-seizes-assets-former-opposition-deputy-zarrab-case

31-“Turkey’s former top scorer Zafer Biryol re-detained in post-coup investigation”
https://turkeypurge.com/turkeys-former-top-scorer-zafer-biryol-re-detained-post-coup-investigation

32-“47 including Gülen’s nephew detained in new post-coup probe”
https://turkeypurge.com/47-including-gulens-nephew-detained-new-post-coup-probe

33-“Der Spiegel: Erdogan offered Germany a mafia-like ‘prisoner exchange’”
https://turkeypurge.com/der-spiegel-erdogan-offered-germany-mafia-like-prisoner-exchange

34-“Mysterious note left at CHP office’s door threatens: You’ll pay for it, traitors!”
https://turkeypurge.com/mysterious-note-left-chp-offices-door-threatens-youll-pay-traitors

35-“School principal detained for insulting Erdogan”
https://turkeypurge.com/school-principal-detained-insulting-erdogan

36-” Turkish court rules Yeni Asya journalist Nur Ener to remain behind bars”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/06/turkish-court-rules-yeni-asya-journalist-nur-ener-to-remain-behind-bars/

37-“Teacher couple gets 7 years in jail over Gulen links”
https://turkeypurge.com/teacher-couple-gets-7-year-jail-gulen-links

38-“11 Turkish folk dancers apply for asylum in Hungary after performing in Budapest”
https://www.turkishminute.com/2017/12/05/11-turkish-folk-dancers-apply-for-asylum-in-hungary-after-performing-in-budapest/

39-“Veteran Turkish Journalist Hasan Cemal: A Case Where Universal Principles Of Law Forgotten”
https://stockholmcf.org/veteran-journalist-hasan-cemal-a-case-where-universal-principles-of-law-forgotten/

40-“New York Times: Turkey No Safe Zone For Foreign Political Dissidents ”
https://stockholmcf.org/new-york-times-turkey-no-safe-zone-for-foreign-political-dissidents/

41-“Turkish Asylum Seekers In Greece Tell Of Lives Full Of Fear In Erdoğan’s Turkey”
https://stockholmcf.org/turkish-asylum-seekers-in-greece-tell-of-lives-full-of-fear-in-erdogans-turkey/

42-“Steudtner: Detained Activists In Turkey Face ‘Unfair’ Judicial System”
https://stockholmcf.org/steudtner-detained-activists-in-turkey-face-unfair-judicial-system/

Türkiye tarafından işlenenen İnsan Hakları İhlalleri | 12/4/2017-12/11/2017

1-“Mehmet Baransu’ya yine savunma yaptırmadılar!”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/mehmet-baransuya-yine-savunma-yaptirmadilar-h108526.html

2-“Güney Afrikalı yetimler, hapishanedeki bebekler için yürüdü!”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/guney-afrikali-yetimler-hapishanedeki-bebekler-icin-yurudu-h108525.html

3-“Baskı rejiminin olduğu Türkiye’den kaçış!”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/baski-rejiminin-oldugu-turkiyeden-kacis-h108522.html

4-“Erdoğan’ın danışmanı cemaati ‘yargısız infaz’larla tehdit etti!”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/erdoganin-danismani-cemaati-yargisiz-infazlarla-tehdit-etti-h108512.html

5-“Ayda ortalama bin Türk Almanya’dan sığınma istedi!”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/ayda-ortalama-bin-turk-almanyadan-siginma-istedi-h108514.html

6-“Cezaevi tutsağı gazeteci Büşra Erdal’dan mektup var: ‘şükür ki OHAL’de kuşlara ziyaret yasağı yok, kitaplar da ötekileştirmiyor”
http://www.tr724.com/cezaevi-tutsagi-gazeteci-busra-erdaldan-mektup-var-sukur-ki-ohalde-kuslara-ziyaret-yasagi-yok-kitaplar-da-otekilestirmiyor/

7-“AKP’nin havuzu Akit TV Zeyno Erkan’ı tekrar hedef gösterdi”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/akpnin-havuzu-akit-tv-zeyno-erkani-tekrar-hedef-gosterdi-h108785.html

8-“İşte AKP rejiminin yıkım raporu.. Binlerce ölü, işkence, OHAL ve KHK’lar..”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/iste-akp-rejiminin-yikim-raporu-binlerce-olu-iskence-ohal-ve-khklar-h108775.html

9-“İsveçli Sol Parti Lideri: Demirtaş davasından sonra polis bizi tehdit etti”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/isvecli-sol-parti-lideri-demirtas-davasindan-sonra-polis-bizi-tehdit-etti-h108776.html

10-“Süreç uzarsa intihar vakaları başlayabilir”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/surec-uzarsa-intihar-vakalari-baslayabilir-h108743.html

11-“AKP iktidarının, doğumhane kapısındaki utanç nöbeti!”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/akp-iktidarinin-dogumhane-kapisindaki-utanc-nobeti-h108576.html

12-“Yüksekova’da 4 sivili öldüren zırhlı polis aracının kamera görüntüleri ortaya çıktı..”
http://aktifhaber.com/iskence/yuksekovada-4-sivili-olduren-zirhli-polis-aracinin-kamera-goruntuleri-ortaya-cikti-h108597.html

13-“BBC: Türkiye’den kaçan yüzlerce Gülen Cemaati üyesi Selanik’te”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/bbc-turkiyeden-kacan-yuzlerce-gulen-cemaati-uyesi-selanikte/

14-“Siz ‘Gülenci’siniz, benim cezaevine düşerseniz size yapacağımı biliyorum”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/siz-gulencisiniz-benim-cezaevine-duserseniz-size-yapacagimi-biliyorum/

15-“Savunma: ‘Kafasına miğferle vurulmadı, nar isabet ettiği için öldü’”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/savunma-kafasina-migferle-vurulmadi-nar-isabet-ettigi-icin-oldu/

16-“‘Dengeler değiştiği an serbest kalacağız, çünkü suçlu değiliz’”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/ahmet-turan-alkan-20-yillik-zaman-yazariyim-inandigimi-yazdim-onur-duyuyorum/

17-“Tacı gitti, şimdi hapsi isteniyor”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/taci-gitti-simdi-hapsi-isteniyor/

18-“‘Cezama razıyım, ama terörist suçlamasını kabul etmiyorum’”
http://www.kronos.news/tr/adliye-calisani-114-kisiye-terorden-12-yila-kadar-hapis-cezasi/

19-“323 gün sonra özgür kalan Öğreten: Gazetecilik hala hapiste”
http://www.diken.com.tr/323-gun-sonra-ozgur-kalan-ogreten-gazetecilik-hala-hapiste/

20-“Sesleri duyulmayan 16 bin 500 askeri öğrenci”
http://aktifhaber.com/15-temmuz/sesleri-duyulmayan-16-bin-500-askeri-ogrenci-h108821.html

21-“Süleyman Soylu’dan Kılıçdaroğlu’na: Sen bittin”
http://aktifhaber.com/politika/suleyman-soyludan-kilicdarogluna-sen-bittin-h108816.html

22-“Artık üç örgüte üyelikten tutuklanıyor insanlar”
http://aktifhaber.com/gundem/artik-uc-orgute-uyelikten-tutuklaniyor-insanlar-h108806.html

23-“Arev tutuklu anne babasına kavuştu”
http://aktifhaber.com/genel/arev-tutuklu-anne-babasina-kavustu-h108809.html

24-“Alman İnsan Hakları Sorumlusu’ndan Türkiye açıklaması”
http://aktifhaber.com/dunya/alman-insan-haklari-sorumlusundan-turkiye-aciklamasi-h108802.html

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