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State Department Report on Turkey

Turkey 2018 Human Rights Report

Turkey 2018 Human Rights Report

April 2019 / (63Pages)

Turkey is a constitutional republic with an executive presidential system and a 600-seat legislature. The unicameral parliament (the Grand National Assembly) exercises legislative authority. The most recent presidential and parliamentary elections took place on June 24; Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) observers expressed concern regarding restrictions on media reporting and the campaign environment that restricted the ability of opposition candidates to compete on an equal basis and campaign freely, including the continued detention of a presidential candidate. Civilian leaders maintained effective control over security forces. The government dismissed thousands of additional police and military personnel on terrorism-related grounds using state of emergency decrees and new anti-terror laws as part of its response to the failed coup attempt of July 2016. Read More

 

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Turkey 2017 International Religious Freedom Report

Turkey 2017 International Religious Freedom Report

May 2018 / (22Pages)

From July 2016 through the end of the year, police arrested more than 50,000 individuals for alleged ties to the Gulen movement or related groups. During the year the government suspended or dismissed thousands of public officials from state institutions, including more than a thousand Diyanet employees. The government continued to prosecute individuals for “openly disrespecting the religious belief of a group” and continued to limit the rights of non-Muslim minorities, especially those not recognized under the 1923 Lausanne Treaty Read More

 

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Turkey 2017 Human Rights Report

Turkey 2017 Human Rights Report

April 2018 / (64 Pages)

The most significant human rights issues included alleged torture of detainees in official custody; allegations of forced disappearance; arbitrary arrest and detention under the state of emergency of tens of thousands, including members of parliament and two Turkish-national employees of the U.S. Mission to Turkey, for alleged ties to terrorist groups or peaceful legitimate speech; executive interference with independence of the judiciary, affecting the right to a fair trial and due process; political prisoners, including numerous elected officials; severe restriction of freedoms of expression and media, including imprisonment of scores of journalists, closing media outlets, and criminalization of criticism of government Read More

 

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Turkey 2016 Human Rights Report

Turkey 2016 Human Rights Report

March 2017 / (75 Pages)

Following the July 15 coup attempt, the government on July 20 declared a three-month state of emergency, which was renewed in October. The government suspended and dismissed tens of thousands of civil servants, who generally had little access to legal recourse or appeal, and closed thousands of businesses, schools, and associations. The government interfered greatly with freedom of expression. There is clear evidence of inadequate protection of civilians. Human rights groups reported that security forces killed and injured persons who attempted to cross illegally from Syria into Turkey and documented reports of torture and abuse of prisoners following the coup attempt. The government impeded access by international media and observers to conflict areas, limiting independent reporting about conditions Read More

 

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Turkey 2015 Human Rights Report

Turkey 2015 Human Rights Report

April 2016 / (74 Pages)

The most significant human rights abuses include governmental interference with freedom of expression, impunity and weak administration of justice and inadequate protection of civilians. Multiple provisions in the law created the opportunity for the government to restrict freedom of expression, the press, and the Internet. Government pressure on the media continued. Representatives of Gulenist and some liberal media outlets were denied access to official events and in some cases, denied press accreditation. Authorities applied the broad antiterror laws extensively with little transparency to arrest opposition political party members and individuals accused of association with the PKK or the Fethullah Gulen movement. Other human rights problems included overcrowding and substandard conditions in prisons Read More

 

 

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